DIY: Homemade Limoncello

A few months ago, my Chief Culinary Consultant and I stopped by my grandparents’ so he could bring them a few summer squash from his garden. We ended up staying for a few hours, playing some cards and eating snacks. I’m not sure how it came up, but my grandma started telling us about her neighbor who makes his own limoncello, and that he had recently brought them a bottle, which was in the refrigerator. My grandma had his recipe, but had never tried making it. Needless to say, I immediately asked for the recipe. My Chief Culinary Consultant and I thought it would be a fun project and would make great Christmas gifts!

You’ll notice in the photos below that there is a large amount of liquid and lemons; we decided to more than triple the recipe since we were taking the time to make it. If you make a single recipe, your quantities will be much smaller.

There are four primary steps to making limoncello:

Step #1: Infusing the alcohol with the lemon. The lemons are peeled, and the peels and alcohol are combined in a large glass container. Once it’s sealed, it’s left to sit for at least 10 days, or up to three weeks.

Step #2: Combining the steeped alcohol with a simple syrup. The alcohol mixture is strained in a colander, the peels discarded, and then combined with a simple syrup mixture that adds sweetness to the limoncello.

Step #3: First filtration. Once the alcohol has been combined with the simple syrup, the limoncello is filtered for the first time. The easiest way to do this is with a fine-mesh sieve and coffee filters.

Step #4: Second filtration and bottling. This time the filtering can be done directly into the bottle(s) that you’re planning to use to store the final limoncello. Using a funnel and coffee filters, the filtering is done in the exact same manner as in step #3. The limoncello is filtered a second time to ensure that there is no sediment in the drink.

We more than tripled the recipe and it made enough to fill twelve 16-ounce swing-top bottles, with enough leftover for probably two more bottles (I had only ordered a case of 12 bottles). I got my bottles from Northern Brewer (the price for a case of 12 was a steal!), but you can find tons of different bottles on Amazon, and if you’re looking for something other than swing-top bottles, Specialty Bottle offers a great variety.

This is a relatively simple (and fun!) project. The prep is easy and the hardest part is waiting for it to be finished steeping! The final drink is extremely smooth (yet strong!), sweet and full of lemon flavor. Keep the bottles in the freezer and break out the limoncello for after-dinner sipping. You could also use it in lemon-limoncello cupcakes (yum!), or create homemade labels and gift tags and give bottles as gifts – perfect for the holidays, birthdays, housewarming or even a hostess gift instead of a bottle of wine.

One year ago: Classic Apple Pie
Two years ago: Fig and Almond Cheesecake
Three years ago: Italian Sausage, Red Pepper & Mushroom Risotto
Four years ago: Cream of Mushroom Soup
Five years ago: Cornbread

Limoncello

Yield: 2 liters

Prep Time: 10 to 15 days

Total Time: 10 to 15 days

Ingredients:

1 liter grain alcohol (Everclear)*
10 lemons
5 cups water
4 cups granulated sugar

Directions:

1. First, wash and dry your lemons. Since you're going to be using the peel exclusively, you want to make sure they don't have any residue on them. Next, peel your lemons (a vegetable peeler works perfectly for this job) - you don't want to get too much of the white pith under the peel, so try to peel as thinly as possible. Put the peels into a large glass container. Add the alcohol, making sure that it completely covers the peels. Let the mixture steep for 10 days, or up to 3 weeks.

2. Place a colander inside of a large bowl. Pour the alcohol mixture into the colander and drain, using a wooden spoon to press out any excess liquid from the peels. Discard the peels.

3. In a large saucepan, combine the water and sugar over low heat, stirring occasionally, until the sugar is dissolved and the syrup is clear. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature, then add the simple syrup to the alcohol mixture and stir to combine.

4. Place a wire mesh strainer over a large, clean bowl and place a coffee filter inside the mesh strainer. Slowly pour the limoncello through the coffee filter. Once the amount of liquid straining through slows down considerably or stops, replace the coffee filter with a new one and continue until all of the limoncello has been filtered, replacing coffee filters as needed.

5. Next, filter again and fill the bottles as follows: Place a funnel into the mouth of the bottle you'll use for your finished limoncello. Place a coffee filter inside the funnel, and slowly pour the limoncello through the coffee filter to fill the bottle. Seal the bottle(s) and store in the freezer indefinitely.

*Note: If you can't obtain grain alcohol where you live, you can substitute 100-proof vodka. Most vodkas are sold in 750mL bottles (versus the 1 liter of grain alcohol called for in the recipe). If this is the size you purchase, adjust the rest of your ingredients as follows: 8 lemons, 4 cups water and 3 cups sugar.

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88 Responses to “DIY: Homemade Limoncello”

  1. Gretchen on September 27, 2012 at 3:35 am

    I really want to make this for Christmas gifts! I think my family
    would love them! My question is…what is the shelf life for them? Thanks!!

    Reply

    • Michelle on September 27th, 2012 at 10:09 am

      Hi Gretchen, If you keep the limoncello in the freezer, it will keep pretty much indefinitely – years!

      Reply

      • Gretchen on September 27th, 2012 at 10:16 am

        Thanks!! For some reason, wasn’t thinking about freezing it!! Making this VERY soon then. Ordering bottles now!!

        Reply

      • Gretchen on September 27th, 2012 at 10:34 am

        One more question…is 1 liter…just one bottle of the Everclear?

        Reply

        • Michelle on September 30th, 2012 at 10:20 pm

          Hi Gretchen, Yes, the bottles are marked, but Everclear is typically sold in 1 liter bottles, although I have seen a larger, “jumbo” bottle which is 1.75 liters, but like I said, they are marked.

          Reply

          • sav on July 13th, 2013 at 5:23 am

            Where do you buy your everclear?

            Reply

            • Michelle on July 15th, 2013 at 9:47 am

              Hi Sav, We made this while we were on vacation in Florida, so I bought it at a Total Wine (i.e. liquor store) down there.

  2. Kathryn on September 27, 2012 at 4:24 am

    Love this idea, what a great gift for Christmas!

    Reply

  3. Donna on September 27, 2012 at 4:25 am

    This is a fabulous idea for Christmas gifts..How much in advance can I make this for gift-giving?..Also…just what would one use for Everclear in Europe?..I live in France and would love to find out about an equivalent option?..Thank you for sharing this great, money-saving recipe!

    Reply

    • Michelle on September 27th, 2012 at 10:11 am

      Hi Donna, You can make it as far in advance as you’d like. Just store the bottles in a cool, dark place or, if you have the room, in the refrigerator or freezer.

      If you don’t have access to grain alcohol where you live, you can use 100-proof vodka. Please see the bottom of the recipe for the adaptation.

      Reply

      • Ron on April 17th, 2014 at 4:25 pm

        Actually, vodka does not work very well for limoncello. It yields a qualitatively different taste than the authentic recipe. My recipe comes from my Italian relatives in Italy and it lays out the same steps in your recipe including the use of Everclear pure alcohol (easily found in big liquor stores in the vodka/gin department) but they do not strain it. They (and I agree) see no point since the peels do not leave any noticeable residue.

        Reply

  4. Sarah on September 27, 2012 at 6:26 am

    Looks fun! I’ve always wanted to try making it. I made a similar liquor years ago with rhubarb! My question is, what did you do with the rest of the lemons? ;)

    Reply

    • Michelle on September 27th, 2012 at 10:12 am

      Oooh, rhubarb flavored would be delicious! I’ve seen versions with blood oranges and grapefruit as well. So many great options! As for the rest of the lemons – I put the peeled lemons in a ziploc freezer bag and froze them to be used later.

      Reply

      • Brenda on December 3rd, 2012 at 8:10 am

        Hi Michelle, getting ready to start mine today and I am planning to juice the rest of the lemons, freeze the juice for use in lemonade or recipes, put a few of the pulps thru the garbage disposer and compost the rest!

        Reply

  5. Lori on September 27, 2012 at 6:42 am

    I made Limoncello last year with much success but I zested the lemon. I like your idea so much better..The peels look like you might get more of the essence of the lemon. Thanks for posting.

    Reply

  6. Teri on September 27, 2012 at 6:56 am

    Hi,

    This looks great! I’ve always wanted to make this! Quick question ~ when the lemon peels are steeping in the alcohol for 10 days in step one, should this be refrigerated? (That would be my assumption). Also, how long will it keep in the fridge and freezer?
    Thanks so much ~

    Teri

    Reply

    • Michelle on September 27th, 2012 at 9:44 am

      Hi Teri, It does not need to be refrigerated. You should store it in a cool, dark place like a pantry or a closet. It will last in the freezer for years (i.e. indefinitely!).

      Reply

  7. Carolyn on September 27, 2012 at 7:02 am

    I can’t wait to try this!
    1 Question: What proof Everclear did you use?
    And-my daughter made the Lemoncello cupcakes for me for Mother’s Day-YUM!

    Reply

    • Michelle on September 27th, 2012 at 10:14 am

      Hi Carolyn, My grandma’s neighbor’s recipe didn’t indicate a proof level, but I assume the 151-proof, as the 190 would likely be way too strong.

      Reply

  8. Jennifer @ Peanut Butter and Peppers on September 27, 2012 at 7:46 am

    Great idea!!! I love it and it would be perfect for giving as a gift!

    Reply

  9. Anne on September 27, 2012 at 8:33 am

    I make limoncello and it keeps in the freezer for years, becoming smoother and even more delicious as it ages. It’s actually much better after at least a year!

    Reply

  10. icakepops on September 27, 2012 at 9:35 am

    How delicious! I love the bright lemon flavor!

    Reply

  11. Marie B on September 27, 2012 at 10:07 am

    Hi Michelle! We make limoncello also. It is so delicious, isn’t it? Thanks so much for the links on buying the bottles. I will definitely use them when I made my next batch…

    Reply

  12. Marie | FeelingFoodish on September 27, 2012 at 10:19 am

    In the Philadelphia area, some people are also making Chocolacello and Orangecello…yum! Same premise, one different ingredient.

    Reply

  13. Jackie on September 27, 2012 at 10:27 am

    Quick question – once they are out of the freezer, how long can this be at room temperature? I am thinking of giving this as gifts for Christmas and when I am handing them out to folks, I want to include on the tag how quickly it should be refridgerated

    Reply

    • Gretchen on September 27th, 2012 at 10:30 am

      Good question…I’m curious now too!! :)

      Reply

    • Michelle on September 30th, 2012 at 10:20 pm

      Hi Jackie, They can stay out of the refrigerator/freezer for any amount of time. The drink won’t go bad, it just tastes the absolute best straight from the freezer :)

      Reply

  14. Laura Dembowski on September 27, 2012 at 11:37 am

    What a perfect present for people. It looks great!

    Reply

  15. kathy on September 27, 2012 at 11:43 am

    Do you recommend steeping this with the lemon peels for the 10 days in fridge or at room temp?

    Reply

    • Michelle on September 30th, 2012 at 10:19 pm

      Hi Kathy, You can steep it at room temperature. Just be sure to store it in a place that doesn’t get a ton of sunlight or too much warmth. The inside of a walk-in pantry or closet is perfect.

      Reply

  16. Sue on September 27, 2012 at 1:15 pm

    Have lemon tree and make this every year. After a couple tries, I use less sugar as everyone thought it was too sweet. Also freeze in mason jars. For light summer drink use 2/3 limoncella and 1/3 seltzer water and everyone loves it.

    Reply

    • Alex on February 27th, 2013 at 6:16 pm

      Hi Sue, we also thought the sweetness was over-powering even the alcohol. What did you end up using in the simple syrup recipe? 5 cups water, 3 cups sugar?

      Reply

  17. Katie @ Blonde Ambition on September 27, 2012 at 2:02 pm

    My boyfriend’s mom just sent him home to me with a bottle of her homemade limoncello! It really isn’t all too difficult to make, and the result is definitely worth it :)

    Reply

  18. Ashley @ Wishes and Dishes on September 27, 2012 at 3:17 pm

    I have been waiting for this one to pop up on the blog! This is amazing!

    Reply

  19. Tracey on September 27, 2012 at 5:41 pm

    Such a fun project, I love this!! I just might need to make some for my family before the holiday :)

    Reply

  20. Tracy {Pale Yellow} on September 27, 2012 at 6:07 pm

    Great gift idea! So easy and delicious!

    Reply

  21. rachel on September 29, 2012 at 12:42 am

    Does the recipe posted reflect how much you made? Or did you triple this? I can’t figure out the metric conversion of 2 litres into 12 ounce bottles!

    Reply

    • Michelle on September 30th, 2012 at 10:46 pm

      Hi Rachel, We more than tripled the recipe, which I noted in the post. The yield of the recipe is 2 liters because you’re adding the simple syrup to the 1 liter of alcohol mixture. 2 liters is approximately 68 ounces, which means you could figure on getting about 5-6 12-ounce bottles out of this recipe.

      Reply

  22. Joy on September 29, 2012 at 9:13 am

    Can’t wait to try this! The “steeping” step: Do we steep at room temp or in the fridge? Thank you! :)

    Reply

    • Michelle on September 30th, 2012 at 10:42 pm

      Hi Joy, You steep at room temperature. Enjoy!

      Reply

  23. Anthony on September 30, 2012 at 10:04 pm

    been trying this recipe and not sure if I am doing something wrong

    how does your limoncello turn out so colourful and also thick/murky looking

    mine is very pale in colour and quite clear.

    thanks

    Reply

    • Michelle on October 1st, 2012 at 11:46 pm

      Hi Anthony, How long has the mixture been steeping? It’s quite pale and much clearer in the beginning, when you first add the lemon peel. As the days progress, the liquid will take on a much deeper yellow color.

      Reply

      • Anthony on October 2nd, 2012 at 12:10 am

        Hi Michelle,

        ive made 2 different batches over the last 2 months

        one was steeping with lemon peel for 10 days
        the other one has been for 20 days

        both have come out pretty much the same. not so bright yellow. also is there a way to make the mixture look thick?
        the limoncello ive bought from Italy recently is quite thick looking. not a see through mixture.

        thanks

        Reply

        • Michelle on October 3rd, 2012 at 11:22 am

          Hi Anthony, My limoncello did not look thick until I stirred in the simple syrup; then it took on that cloudy, thick look. I’m not positive, but the lack of color could be due to the lemons that you’re using. If they’re older or not quite ripe, they may not be releasing as much oil.

          Reply

  24. p on October 1, 2012 at 6:22 pm

    I have made limencello with simple syrup. my problem is that the sugar re crysatilled in the bottom of the bottle. Do you have any ideas how to reincorporate it or what went wrong? thanks

    Reply

    • Michelle on October 3rd, 2012 at 11:09 am

      The key here is to make sure that the sugar has completely dissolved when making the simple syrup. If it completely dissolves, then there won’t be any sugar crystals in the bottle.

      Reply

  25. Jen @ My Kitchen Addiction on October 2, 2012 at 9:02 pm

    I have wanted to make my own limoncello for a long time… It’s one of my favorites, and I think it would make fabulous gifts! So glad you posted this recipe… I am bookmarking it to make for Christmas gifts!

    Reply

  26. Teri on October 4, 2012 at 3:19 pm

    Hi,
    I’m planning to start this next week to bottle up for Christmas gifts this year. I’m going to be using Everclear, as the recipe recommends. Do you have any idea what the alcohol content of the finished product would be? Can I assume that it would be somewhere around 45% since I’m adding an equal amount of liquid that does not have any alcohol to the Everclear. I’d like to be able to put some sort of guideline on my gift tags since the content will be much higher than, let’s say, a bottle of wine. Having said all that, I can not wait to take a sip of this finished product straight from the freezer! It sounds simply delicious!
    Thanks,
    Teri

    Reply

    • Michelle on October 5th, 2012 at 7:01 pm

      Hi Teri, Unfortunately I’m not an alcohol expert and couldn’t give you an accurate number for the alcohol %. You could say that it is 2-3x the alcohol content of wine, but I don’t have an actual number for you. Have fun making it!

      Reply

  27. Ardex Cp Concrete Patch on October 6, 2012 at 11:18 am

    I had no idea that just the lemon peels were used to make limoncello… thats new information to me!

    Reply

  28. Marina Maria on October 9, 2012 at 4:34 pm

    Hi Michelle,

    I’ve been reading your blog for a while, although this is the first time leave a comment. I love your recipes!

    I have a question and I think it is a stupid one, but here it goes: when you first mix the alcohol and the lemon peels in the glass contender, should I cover it? In the pictures the lid is off, so I was wondering how should I do it.

    Thank you!

    Reply

    • Michelle on October 11th, 2012 at 5:02 pm

      Hi Marina, Not a stupid question! I left it open while I was taking photos, but yes, you should cover the container while the mixture is steeping.

      Reply

  29. Janice on October 14, 2012 at 8:24 pm

    And then, I read the words “Chef Culinary Consultant” and wonder if this person has a name. Good for you to have that person. I need one of those.

    Reply

  30. sarah on October 28, 2012 at 11:39 am

    Living in California I do not have access to everclear. Is there another alcohol I could use? I would have to make a couple hour trip to Nevada otherwise :(

    Reply

    • Michelle on October 30th, 2012 at 2:46 pm

      Hi Sarah, Yes, as indicated in the recipe above, you can substitute 100-proof vodka for the Everclear.

      Reply

    • Anne on December 30th, 2012 at 10:05 pm

      In response to your post…you must live in the boonies inCa because I too livein California and Everclear is sold everywhere. We get it every Halloween to make jungle juice. Just an FYI.

      Reply

  31. Jennifer on November 5, 2012 at 12:26 pm

    I have a question, I am making this recipe as christmas gifts for friends and family I’ve almost tripled the recipe and its about ready to start filtering and adding the simple syrup mixture, however i just realzed i used 80% proof vodka instead of 100% proof. Will the recipe still work or will i have to start all over again?

    Reply

    • Michelle on November 6th, 2012 at 3:07 pm

      Hi Jennifer, No need to start over! The liquor just won’t be as strong or as full-flavored as if you had used a higher proof vodka.

      Reply

      • Jennifer on November 7th, 2012 at 10:24 am

        Do I need to sterilize the bottles the Limoncello is going into? and if so how do I do that?

        Reply

        • Michelle on November 7th, 2012 at 1:11 pm

          Hi Jennifer, I just ran the bottles and tops through the dishwasher before using.

          Reply

  32. Tami on November 18, 2012 at 6:30 pm

    I just finished making this, and my oh my, is it ever good. I made 1/2 the recipe, and it still made lots. Every Italian family has its own recipe, and this one will be ours. :)

    Reply

  33. Kim on December 1, 2012 at 6:14 pm

    does the container have to be glass or can I use plastic??

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 2nd, 2012 at 11:15 am

      Hi Kim, It should be glass. From what I read at the time, plastic can cause issues with the steeping.

      Reply

    • Kabe on June 3rd, 2013 at 6:57 am

      I know this comment is months old, but I wanted to share – I always use Michelle’s recipe and always use large plastic tupperwares for my steep (I have 4L of vodka steeping in the basement right now for my wedding in August!). No problems with flavor, consistency or anything.

      Reply

  34. Rebecca on December 5, 2012 at 2:39 am

    I am going to use this for Christmas presents this year, thanks! Any idea as to why the vodka has to be 100 proof? I live in Cambodia and not sure I can find Everclear, but an old roommate left like 3L of Stolichynia Vodka at our house and I’d like to use it up. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 5th, 2012 at 5:58 pm

      Hi Rebecca, The higher proof alcohol helps draw out the oils from the lemon peels, resulting in a more concentrated lemon flavor. I’m sure you could use what you have on hand and it will still be good, just not quite as strong!

      Reply

  35. frost on December 13, 2012 at 5:04 am

    cool. i should do this sometime

    Reply

  36. Annarosa on December 19, 2012 at 3:43 pm

    My family are Italian so i should have been able to make this; but (notice the but) i had an old recipie and i had been following that but i have mislaid it hence coming on here and trying to pick up your recipie. My old Italian receipie steeps it for quite a long time; mine has been ‘in steep’ for about 5 weeks then i noticed i was unable to find the recipie. I used 3 75cl bottles of Russian standard triple distilled vodka, the peel from 14-16 lemons. When i made the syrup i used 5-6 cups of water and 4 good cups of sugar. The syrup went clear i waited until room temp: then after i have strained the lemon peels i added the syrup to the dull lemon/vodka mixture but it has only thickened sligtly and has not turned cloudy and is is still quite dull. I lost quite a bit when i pured through the muslin cloth and everything is now really sticky…i haven’t bottled it yet i am waiting for it to cool (this has only happened in the last 30 mins) Help how can i resurect it??? I have 5 more batches still in steep, some 4 weeks, 3 weeks and so on but less vodka and lemon peel. (my recipie said to put a whole lemons worth of peel in the bottle when the mixture is finaly bottled, shall i do this…HELP please!!

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 19th, 2012 at 4:19 pm

      Hi Annarosa, Without actually having worked with your recipe before, it would be very difficult for me to pinpoint what went wrong, although I’m still unsure as to what the problem is? Because it’s not thick and not cloudy? My guess is that the color could vary based on the alcohol and lemons used; it may not be a loss at all.

      Reply

  37. Teri on January 13, 2013 at 10:33 am

    Hi Michelle,
    I made this for Christmas gifts this year and what a hit! I used the recommended grain alcohol and was sure to indicate that on my labels. An aunt of mine mentioned raspicello and I want to try that next. I store my limoncello in the freezer and was wondering what your opinion was about storing the raspicello in the freezer ~ if the juice from the raspberries might actually change the consistency and it would actually freeze and ruin. I made vodka infused with maraschino cherries and stored that in the freezer ~ it actually froze and I had to throw it away. I know that the raspicello would have a much higher alcohol content because of the grain alcohol I would use. Any thoughts? I tried to research it online without success.

    Thanks,
    Teri

    Reply

    • Michelle on January 15th, 2013 at 6:40 pm

      Hi Teri, I have never used raspberries in this recipe, so unfortunately I’m unsure about how it would freeze. Usually vodka or grain alcohol does not freeze, but given your experience with the cherries, now I’m suspicious.

      Reply

  38. Keeley on January 16, 2013 at 6:05 pm

    When combining the sugar and water mixture, does the water have to be “clear” if you started with a brown sugar?? Thanks so much, hope it comes out as wonderful as yours looks!

    Reply

    • Michelle on January 16th, 2013 at 11:32 pm

      Hi Keeley, I would not recommend using brown sugar in the simple syrup; I would go with regular white, granulated sugar. If you do use brown, however, I don’t believe there is any way you’ll end up with perfectly clear water.

      Reply

  39. Jenny on January 26, 2013 at 10:51 pm

    My brother makes limoncello from my grandmother’s recipe. he went online to see other vairations of the recipe and loved the cordial glasses in your pictures, where did you purchase them?

    Reply

    • Michelle on January 27th, 2013 at 2:03 pm

      Hi Jenny, I actually didn’t buy them. They are from my great Aunt – she had multiple sets of glassware with those red, white and green stripes. She gave some to all of the women in our family.

      Reply

      • Jenny on January 27th, 2013 at 10:45 pm

        Ok… Thanks. They are so classic looking.

        Reply

  40. Val on April 26, 2013 at 10:02 pm

    I am definitely going to try this. One of the terrific Italian restaurants here makes their own Limoncello. It’s very expensive and very strong. So strong that my husband calls it, “jet fuel”. :) I am extremely impressed with all of your recipes, Brown Eyed Baker… Bravo!

    Reply

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  42. Eddie on June 23, 2013 at 4:28 pm

    It’s going to be ending of mine day, except before finish I am reading this impressive post to increase my knowledge.

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  43. ping on July 19, 2013 at 10:39 am

    hi i just wondering why your one and my one is so different

    yours is much yellow and unclear.

    did you put the lemon juice in it??

    or coz i didnt put enough syrup in it? my syrup look very clear as water

    thank you

    Reply

    • Michelle on July 19th, 2013 at 8:37 pm

      Hi Ping, It’s virtually impossible for me to pinpoint the reasoning, but it could have to do with the pigmentation of the lemons and how long you steeped the alcohol for. The longer you steeped, the more yellow the color.

      Reply

  44. Laura on August 8, 2013 at 8:04 am

    Great information! I’m Italian and have been making limoncello for the past year now before coming upon your post. I’ve had good results with 100 proof Smirnoff (tried using 80 proof but the resulting limoncello froze when stored in freezer). Also used Everclear once but the resulting limoncello was way too strong for my taste. I never thought about using the whole lemon peel — and had been told that if any pith gets into the mixture, the end result will be bitter. I’m guessing that this has not happened to you.

    Also, I steep my lemons for much longer — 40-45 days in the alcohol, then add simple syrup, then steep for another 40-45 days before filtering.

    Thanks for sharing this great post! Now working on finding fun bottles and labels.
    Laura in Washington DC

    Reply

  45. Katie on November 17, 2013 at 3:17 pm

    Hi!! I am just starting this recipe and realized I have a lot of vodka to use:) My bottles are 1.75L… I have converted the recipe and came up with 18 lemons, 9 1/3 cup of water and 7 cups of sugar. Does this sound correct? Thanks!

    Reply

  46. Denise on December 3, 2013 at 10:48 am

    Just ordered my bottles! (Followed your link to Northern Brewer:)

    Reply

  47. jean on January 1, 2014 at 12:33 pm

    What do you think about trying this with a flavored vodka? I have several different kinds we just don’t drink. But I love limoncello. Rasperry, vanilla, mango and mandarin vodka are in my cupboard.

    Reply

    • Michelle on January 1st, 2014 at 10:38 pm

      Hi Jean, Using the flavored vodka will of course not result in a clean lemon flavor, but if you’d like to do so, I’d recommend the raspberry of those options – I think it would pair best with the lemon.

      Reply

  48. Pat on August 30, 2014 at 11:22 am

    I have a batch brewing now. I am noticing my liquid is still very clear. Yours is yellow. How did you get yours to turn yellow?? I used 15 lemons and I am steeping mine for 40 days. It is at 33 days now. I have the jars in a bag in a closet next to my bag of Cherry Bounce.

    Reply

    • Michelle on August 31st, 2014 at 12:50 pm

      Hi Pat, I didn’t do anything special to achieve the yellow color, it infused from the lemon rinds.

      Reply

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