Paczki (Polish Doughnuts)

Paczki [Polish Doughnuts] | browneyedbaker.com #recipe #FatTuesday #MardiGras

I first heard of paczki last year around the beginning of Lent, and noticed them at the grocery store around the same time. I did a little digging and found that they are Polish pastries similar to a jelly doughnuts and that they are traditionally made and eaten on Fat Tuesday and Fat Thursday, which I didn’t even know existed! Apparently, Fat Thursday is a traditional Christian feast marking the last Thursday before Lent. Traditionally, it is a day dedicated to eating, when people meet with friends and family to eat large quantities of sweets, cakes and other meals forbidden during Lent. I couldn’t really find anything that spelled out a discernible difference between Fat Tuesday and Fat Thursday, except that it seems certain regions and religions tend to celebrate one or the other. The concept is definitely the same – indulge as much as possible right before Lent!

Now, back to the paczki… The difference between these and a basic doughnut is that paczki are made with a very rich, sweet yeast dough consisting of eggs, butter and milk. Sort of like a brioche doughnut, only better, if you can imagine!

Paczki [Polish Doughnuts] | browneyedbaker.com #recipe #FatTuesday #MardiGras

I made a mental note of paczki last year and definitely wanted to make them when the time rolled around again, and here we are! Tomorrow is Fat Thursday and Fat Tuesday is just around the corner. Let’s get frying!

Paczki [Polish Doughnuts] | browneyedbaker.com #recipe #FatTuesday #MardiGras

When I started to poke around for recipes, I called my grandma (who is 100% Polish) to see if she had a recipe for paczki. Sadly, she did not, but said that her mom used to make them. Bummed, I started Googling “paczki recipe” and then got smart and revised it to “grandma’s paczki recipe”. I wanted something really authentic and I found more than a handful of recipes originating with someone’s grandma. While all of the ingredients were the same, the quantities and methods varied from recipe to recipe, so I hacked together what I thought sounded delicious and started on my way.

Paczki [Polish Doughnuts] | browneyedbaker.com #recipe #FatTuesday #MardiGras

The most traditional paczki recipes call for filling the doughnuts with fruit preserves or prune butter, while others said their grandma never used a filling. Some say they must be rolled in powdered sugar, while others say they had always been rolled in granulated sugar. I did a batch of each: filled/powdered, filled/granulated, unfilled/powdered, and unfilled/granulated. For the filled ones, I did half raspberry and half apricot preserves.

Paczki [Polish Doughnuts] | browneyedbaker.com #recipe #FatTuesday #MardiGras

My Chief Culinary Consultant and I taste tested all of them and both came to the conclusion that the unfilled ones rolled in granulated sugar were the bee’s knees. Jelly doughnuts were never my thing, so I wasn’t surprised that I preferred the unfilled ones. As for the sugar coating, both tasted good, but I love the crunch of granulated sugar on the outside of a doughnut. So hard to beat it!

If you’re planning to celebrate Fat Thursday tomorrow, or Fat Tuesday next week, you neeeeeed to make paczki part of your menu!

Paczki [Polish Doughnuts] | browneyedbaker.com #recipe #FatTuesday #MardiGras

One year ago: Sesame Chicken and Macadmia Nut, Coconut & White Chocolate Blondies
Two years ago: Beer Battered Cod and Capirotada (Mexican Bread Pudding)
Three years ago: Grilled Fish Tacos and Fig, Date and Almond Granola Bars

Paczki (Polish Doughnuts)

Yield: About 20 to 24 paczki

Prep Time: 2 hours

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours 30 minutes

Traditional Polish paczki - yeasted doughnuts filled with fruit preserves and rolled in sugar, popular on Fat Thursday and Fat Tuesday.

Ingredients:

2 cups whole milk, warmed to 110 degrees F
4½ teaspoons active dry yeast (2 packages)
¾ cup + 1 pinch granulated sugar, divided
5 to 6 cups all-purpose flour, divided
1 egg
4 egg yolks
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1¼ teaspoons salt
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and cooled
Peanut oil, canola oil or lard, for frying
Fruit preserves, for filling
Powdered and granulated sugars, for coating

Directions:

1. Pour warm milk into bowl of a stand mixer. Stir in the yeast and a pinch of granulated sugar. Let stand for 5 to 10 minutes, or until it has become bubbly.

2. Add 2 cups of flour to the mixture and stir with a wooden spoon until a smooth batter forms. Cover with plastic wrap and set in a warm spot for 30 minutes. The mixture should have risen and be very bubbly.

3. In a medium bowl, whisk the egg and egg yolks until pale yellow and frothy, about 3 minutes. Add the sugar, vanilla extract and salt, and whisk until combined and smooth.

4. Attach the dough hook to the mixer, add the egg mixture to the dough and mix on medium-low speed until mostly combined. Add the melted butter and mix to combine. Gradually add 3 more cups of flour to the mixture and continue to knead until a very soft dough comes together. (It will not clean the sides of the bowl or form a ball; it will be rather slack and a bit sticky.) If necessary, add up to another 1 cup of flour, a spoonful at a time, until the dough forms.

5. Transfer the dough to a lightly greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set in a warm spot until it has doubled in size.

6. Remove the dough from the bowl and turn out onto a floured work surface. With your fingers, push down the dough into an even layer. Sprinkle flour on the dough and roll it out to ½-inch thickness. If the dough doesn't hold its shape and springs back, cover with a damp towel and let rest for a few minutes and try again.

7. Use a 3-inch biscuit cutter to cut out rounds of dough. Transfer the dough rounds to parchment-lined baking sheets. Gather scraps of dough and again roll out and cut until you have used up all of the dough. Cover the baking sheets loosely with plastic wrap and place in a warm, draft-free spot until almost doubled in size, about 30 minutes.

8. Meanwhile, heat at least 1½ inches of oil in a heavy-bottomed pot or deep skillet (I used a 12-inch cast iron skillet) over medium heat to 350 degrees F. Carefully lower about six paczki into the oil at a time (be sure not to over-crowd the pan) and fry until the bottom is golden brown. Carefully turn them over and continue to fry until the other side is golden brown. Use a spider strainer or slotted spoon to remove them to a paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain. Allow the oil to come back to temperature, then repeat until all of the paczki have been fried.

9. Allow the paczki to cool until you are able to handle them easily. Using a filling tip, pipe fruit preserves into the sides of the paczki, then roll in sugar. The paczki are best the same day they are made, but can be stored in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 days.

Share This Post...



102 Responses to “Paczki (Polish Doughnuts)”

Comment Pages 1 2
  1. kittentoes on February 26, 2014 at 12:05 am

    I really need you to do a fastnacht recipe. Potato, of course.

    Reply

    • AndreaL on February 26th, 2014 at 3:04 pm

      Oooohh yeah! :) Fastnachts are always we have on Fat Tuesdays. After eating one (or sometimes more in my case), you can understand why they call it Fat Tuesday ;)

      Reply

  2. Diane White on February 26, 2014 at 12:19 am

    I first had these a few years ago at Oakmont Bakery. They always have several kinds of filled ones.

    Reply

  3. Veronica on February 26, 2014 at 12:19 am

    this is so crazy. just tonight i decided i wanted to try my hand at making donuts and set out to find a recipe. i have never made anything bad from you so i tried here first and this is what i see? perfect timing!

    Reply

  4. Hanna Lampi on February 26, 2014 at 12:32 am

    Looks delicious! We have similar doughnuts in Finland and the challenge we have when eating the granulated sugar coated ones is not to lick your lips while eating :) Harder than you think!

    Reply

  5. Debra on February 26, 2014 at 12:35 am

    I have a friend in Poland, and have asked the Tuesday vs Thursday question of him. I’ll let you know his reply :)

    Reply

    • Debra on February 26th, 2014 at 1:27 am

      My Polish born and raised friend does not know Fat Tuesday, only Fat Thursday. Sounds like it is the same thing, just on a different day. Wonder how that happened? Thanks for the recipe for these little gems. I look forward to making them.

      Reply

      • Arielle on March 4th, 2014 at 9:22 pm

        I think in America to correspond better with Mardi Gras it became Fat Tuesday. In Chicago, where my Polish family is from, many Poles celebrate both Thursday and Tuesday in keeping with tradition, but also embracing new customs.

        Reply

        • Ola on November 26th, 2014 at 10:20 pm

          I’m a Pole and we do not celebrate Fat Tuesday, only Thursday

          Reply

  6. Averie @ Averie Cooks on February 26, 2014 at 5:09 am

    My little old Polish grandmother used to make donuts that looked VERY similar to these, and I remember gorging on them as a child. She never called them packzi and we always just called them donuts, but the way you describe the dough as a really sweet yeast dough almost like a brioche donut, YES! That’s my childhood memory of them. Most of the time she did not fill them but just rolled them in sugar. There’s no written recipe in our family for anything like this because my grandmother, like all good polish cooks and grandmothers, never wrote a thing down and stored it all in her head. Sigh. So thank you for this post! Pinned!

    Reply

  7. Joanna on February 26, 2014 at 5:23 am

    Hi! I’m Joanna and I’m from Poland! It was really nice to me read on your blog about our Polish tradition :) I don’t know a person who doesn’t celebrate Tłusty czwartek – Fat Friday. Everyone should eat pączek that day. I think yours paczki look relly nice! :) I made them on my own every year and more than ones ;) In my family we eat paczki from New Years Eve to Ash Wednesday. I read your blog really often and I thank you so much you wrote this post! Greetings from Zduńska Wola – Poland and I wish you soo sweet Fat Thursday! :D

    Reply

  8. Andrea on February 26, 2014 at 6:07 am

    Once again, just as I start thinking about going on a diet, you post a recipe I want to try. Shame on you!!! But seriously, will be giving these a go tomorrow as “Fat Tuesday” or Mardi Gras or Shrove Tuesday (as it’s known in the UK) is when traditionally you have pancakes (and not the American style thick pancakes, but rather the French style crepes). After that Lent starts, when you are supposed to give up some decadent treat until Easter (that never happens in my house, despite my good intentions). Will report back once made.

    Reply

  9. Cheryl s on February 26, 2014 at 6:30 am

    Sound super yummy! I believe fat Tuesday is celebrated just before ash Wednesday. I had never heard about fat Thursday.

    Reply

    • Cheryl S on February 27th, 2014 at 3:54 am

      Fat Tuesday is Mardi Gras. The last celenration before Lent begins. Catholic roots.

      Reply

  10. Laura @ Lauras Baking Talent on February 26, 2014 at 6:31 am

    This is really big throughout lower Michigan. I grew up with the tradition of getting paczki on Fat Tuesday. Now they show up at work. Some try to be good and just eat half of one…but most of us love indulging for one day :)

    Reply

  11. Maria in NJ ~Dolcelicious Bake Shoppe on February 26, 2014 at 6:34 am

    Lovely recipe Michelle! can you tell us the yield on this though! Just love your blog honey…Come to Cookie Con!

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 26th, 2014 at 5:02 pm

      Hi Maria, The yield is up in the recipe, but 20 to 24 doughnuts.

      Reply

      • Maria in NJ ~Dolcelicious Bake Shoppe on February 26th, 2014 at 6:02 pm

        how did I miss that, I guess i was looking in the instructions for it…thank you Michelle!

        Reply

  12. Lori on February 26, 2014 at 7:52 am

    The Germans make a similiar “donut”. My family’s recipe is unfilled and rolled in cinnamon sugar. Thanks for posting.

    Reply

  13. Liz @ Tip Top Shape on February 26, 2014 at 8:04 am

    I will be celebrating BOTH Fat Tuesday and Fat Thursday. That’s just too good of an opportunity to pass up! These look delicious. I feel like a bad Polish person for never having actually made my own paczki. I have no excuses now that I have this recipe!

    Reply

  14. Linda on February 26, 2014 at 8:13 am

    The doughnuts (Paczki) look lovely! In the part of Texas I came from they were filled with chocolate and vanilla cream, not authentic, but Yummy!
    By the way, my cooking needed some help and a friend directed me to your site, my husband and kiddos thank you. My four year old even says ,”Is that the Brown Eyed Baker site?”.

    Reply

  15. Anula on February 26, 2014 at 8:20 am

    Actually, Fat Thursday is more like a tradition now, since there are not so many people that apply the rules of the Lent ;) even atheists eat pączki on Fat Thursday. There’s no such thing as Fat Tuesday though. I guess, by this you meant Shrovetide, which in Poland is something like Mardi Gras.. We organize big parties and this way celebrate last day of the Carnival. In Polish it is called Ostatki and on this day our ancestors used to eat pączki and other leftovers from Fat Thursday :) In Poland, very popular are also faworki, kind of crust formed in special shape and fried. I have trouble with describing them, so this link should help: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel_wings :)
    I hope I helped to clear some things up ;) I have to say I love your website and this delicious recipies! Greetings from Poland :)

    Reply

    • Anula on February 26th, 2014 at 8:47 am

      I forgot to mention, that traditionally pączki are made with rose petal jam, but nowadays they are served with any filling you want. But always with filling :)

      Reply

  16. morri on February 26, 2014 at 8:38 am

    I admit that I have never, ever, in my entire life, heard of anyone either rolling pączki in granulated sugar or making them completely unfilled. Sure, there are two rival camps: the people who fill their pączki with preserve before frying (that will be me) and people who use a filling tip or a syringe to fill the pastries after they are fried. The latter claim that preserve-filled pączki will never fry properly, but in my opinion, they just need to work on their frying skills ;) And rolling pączki in granulated sugar seems like sacrilege to me. They should be covered in either icing sugar or simple, thin icing. I have never seen anyone use anything else. But, hey, anything goes, it’s always best to let your taste buds be the judge. Other than that, the recipe looks very authentic. I’m glad you enjoyed this beloved Polish sweet!

    Reply

    • Ilona on February 26th, 2014 at 9:08 am

      I agree – thin icing is a must! :) My mom always fills pączki before frying (as my grandmother did). And we use prune butter or self-made cherries preserve. So happy to find one of my best sweet in one of my favourites blogs! :) Greetings from Poznań, Poland :)

      Reply

      • Rory on February 26th, 2014 at 2:54 pm

        I agree with the above icing comments! I’m from America, but I lived in Poland for two and a half years in eight different cities all over the country, and in all my time there I don’t think I ever had one that was covered in anything but a simple icing. They’re perfect that way! But like someone else said, anything goes, right? :) Oh, and I also don’t think I ever had one that wasn’t filled with something. Looks like a great recipe though! Can’t wait to try it! And one a side note, Ilona – of all the places I lived, I lived in Poznań for 6 months and it is by far my favorite! :)

        Reply

        • Ilona on February 27th, 2014 at 5:34 am

          So happy to hear that! :)

          Reply

  17. Joan on February 26, 2014 at 8:38 am

    A bakery near us makes these at this time of year but they fill them with REAL whipped cream! Some with just the cream, some with fruit filling and cream, some with just the fruit filling. So naughty!

    Reply

  18. Susan S on February 26, 2014 at 9:08 am

    Quick question regarding the eggs – if I wanted to half this recipe, what would be the best way to handle the eggs? Should I use one whole egg and two egg yolks? Thanks! Look delicious!!

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 26th, 2014 at 5:02 pm

      Hi Susan, Yes, I would use 1 whole egg and 2 egg yolks. You might need a tad more flour, so just adjust as necessary.

      Reply

  19. marcie on February 26, 2014 at 9:34 am

    Wow…a jelly filled brioche-style donut? That’s living! That would be a great way to celebrate the end of Lent. These look delicious!

    Reply

  20. Amanda on February 26, 2014 at 9:34 am

    I grew up in southwest Michigan, and my grandma made paczki. Hers were rolled in granulated sugar, and had raisins in them. I think her recipe came from my grandpa’s mother, who was a German immigrant from the Volga River area in Russia (confusing, I know!). I now live in Atlanta, which suffers from a severe lack of paczki. Thank you for the great recipe!

    Reply

  21. Peggy Ann on February 26, 2014 at 9:36 am

    I just discovered them this year! At my local Giant Eagle. I live just north of Pittsburgh! I have not attempted to make them yet but I am addicted to them now. I had ones with cream cheese filling! Thanks for the recipe. I love your recipes best, they never fail!

    Reply

  22. Kasia on February 26, 2014 at 9:54 am

    I think the best ones are filled with rose jam. You have to taste it. I can’t wait for tomorrow’s Fat Thursday!
    Greetings from Poland :)

    Reply

  23. Darlene on February 26, 2014 at 10:51 am

    I know you said you’re not a fan of filled donuts, but try making these with a custard filling or an apple pie filling. When I have them with either of those fillings it’s like heaven.

    Reply

  24. Laurie on February 26, 2014 at 11:14 am

    Thanks for posting the recipe Michelle. I am planning on making pączki this weekend. Though 100% Polish, I don’t remember growing up with them but since moving to Pittsburgh, have bought them in the grocery store. I knew homemade would taste so much better. I love the method you used for your recipe. I did the same for Placek. I collected and compared different recipes, looking for what would make it most authentic to my heritage.

    Reply

  25. Laura Dembowski on February 26, 2014 at 11:34 am

    Paczki are very traditional here in the Detroit area. Last year I got some at the supposedly best bakery around and was so disappointed. I am really excited to try this recipe because I really want the paczki I have always dreamed about!

    Reply

  26. Katrina @ WVS on February 26, 2014 at 12:19 pm

    Whoa, these donuts are FAB!! I love the recipe!

    Reply

  27. Tricia @ Saving room for dessert on February 26, 2014 at 12:22 pm

    These sound wonderful and I love the background – very interesting. Never had one but could eat one now!

    Reply

  28. Lorrie on February 26, 2014 at 12:30 pm

    Have you ever had King Cake?

    Reply

    • lynne on February 26th, 2014 at 1:22 pm

      There is a recipe for King Cake on her site – look in the archives.

      Reply

  29. annie on February 26, 2014 at 12:33 pm

    Michelle,
    Thank you for finding and figuring out the recipe for these fabulous donuts. We’ve eaten bought donuts from a Polish bakery here in town, but I’ve never made them from scratch. Their donuts are rolled in granulated sugar and taste so good. You do all the hard work for us, Michelle.

    Reply

  30. kate on February 26, 2014 at 1:00 pm

    I haven’t had a good one since I left Buffalo, so I will have to try these! I prefer the granulated sugar coating with a raspberry filling. Like Kittentoes up there, I’d LOVE a fastnacht recipe as well.

    Reply

  31. Melissa on February 26, 2014 at 2:04 pm

    When I used to work the bakery at Wal-mart making doughnuts, there was a version of these that I loved. I can’t wait to give these a try!

    Reply

  32. Elizabeth on February 26, 2014 at 2:05 pm

    I can’t wait to try these as my husband is Polish & would love them! I had a couple questions though: I know you said you could use a few different kinds of oil, but which did you use & recommend? Also, how much oil should I put in the skillet/pot? Do you want the paczki submerged or just half in? Thanks so much!

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 27th, 2014 at 8:57 am

      Hi Elizabeth, I used peanut oil (I still have a ton left from our deep-fried turkey at Thanksgiving). The paczki only need to be half in the oil. I would add about 2 inches of oil to your skillet or pot (if using a skillet, be sure it has high sides).

      Reply

      • Elizabeth on March 21st, 2014 at 9:18 am

        Michelle, I’ve been meaning to come back and thank you for your response. :) I haven’t made these yet, but was planning to tomorrow. One other question if you have a sec, when you put these or any type of bread that needs to rise in a “warm” spot in your house, where do you put them, and what’s considered warm? I don’t have a warmer, and am always at a loss as to where to warm things. Thanks so much!!

        Reply

        • Michelle on March 21st, 2014 at 1:20 pm

          Hi Elizabeth, I would put them in an oven (that’s not turned on) and turn on the light. That will keep it free of drafts and give it a little ambient heat. Enjoy the paczki!

          Reply

          • Elizabeth on March 21st, 2014 at 1:31 pm

            You’re awesome for getting back to me so quickly! And thank you, I’m so glad to know that little trick about a warm spot :) Have a wonderful weekend with those 2 Goldens of yours!

            Reply

  33. Monika on February 26, 2014 at 2:26 pm

    This looks completely delicious… How much oil did you use for frying?

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 27th, 2014 at 9:29 am

      Hi Monika, I recommend filling the pot or pan with 1½ to 2 inches of oil.

      Reply

      • Monika on February 28th, 2014 at 4:28 pm

        Awesome; thanks for the follow up!

        Reply

  34. Judy on February 26, 2014 at 2:29 pm

    How can you tell when dough has doubled?

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 27th, 2014 at 9:28 am

      Hi Judy, I actually use a straight-sided container (this one: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/flour-bucket-small), put the dough is, measure how high up the side the dough is, then double it and place a piece of tape on that doubled mark. When the dough gets to that mark, it’s doubled :) For instance, if I use a ruler when I put the dough in the container and see that it comes 3 inches up, then I place a piece of tape 6 inches up. There are also some dough-rising containers with marks.

      Reply

  35. Caroline {TheBarbeeHousewife} on February 26, 2014 at 2:37 pm

    I have never heard of paczki before, but now I want some. I may need to make these for Fat Tuesday &/or Thursday! I have never heard of Thursday either!

    Reply

  36. Milena on February 26, 2014 at 2:55 pm

    In my family pączki without filling are called “beznadziejne” (meaning terrible or useless) because filling in Polish is “nadzienie” and “bez” means without. Yours look great, though, only store bought pączek would be filled by a pipe. In my family the most popular filling is sour cherry jam.

    Reply

  37. Bernadette on February 26, 2014 at 3:15 pm

    I was never ever expect to see recipe for Pączki on your blog! So great to see this here. I love your blog because I can find here real recipes for American sweets and I found here very good recipe for Pączki.
    Traditional Polish Pączki look exactly like yours but they are not roll in sugar. They should look like this http://www.mojewypieki.com/przepis/paczki-przepis-iv and they have to be always filled with rose jam.
    About Fat Tuesday – does not exist. We have Fat Thursday and the last day of the Carnival we call Ostatki – Shrovetide (the last day when we can eat Pączki and other fat sweets).
    But everyday in our bakery’s we can buy Pączki. I actually eat Pączki from time to time as my second breakfast at work and I’m not alone in this. But we only make them at home during the Carnival and especially for Fat Thursday. In my Town – Cracow we have also on this day a competitions: which bakery this year sold the best Pączki. This is like the best award for bakery in me town :)

    Reply

  38. Ela on February 26, 2014 at 4:50 pm

    Which do you prefer to use when baking bread, active dry yeast or instant yeast? Thanks.

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 27th, 2014 at 9:38 am

      Hi Ela, It all depends on the recipe, really. I’ve used both.

      Reply

  39. Bob Batz Jr. on February 26, 2014 at 8:35 pm

    What a great and timely post — well done. :)

    Reply

  40. Natasha on February 27, 2014 at 3:20 am

    The ones filled with jam and rolled in powdered sugar look just like the ones in all the bakeries in poland. Yum! And traditionally (according to Mum), it was always rose petal jam :-)

    Reply

  41. Betsy | JavaCupcake.com on February 27, 2014 at 6:09 am

    I’m heading to Poland again this summer…. I’ll have to look for these in a bakery. They look YUM!

    Reply

  42. Becca @ Crumbs on February 27, 2014 at 8:12 am

    Oh wow these look so good! I love that you tried out all the different combinations!

    Reply

  43. Lisa @ Simple Pairings on February 27, 2014 at 9:06 am

    These look incredible! Doughnuts are totally my weakness, which is why your beautiful homemade ones look like heaven to me. Your photographs are gorgeous!! :)

    Reply

  44. Mi on February 27, 2014 at 1:04 pm

    Hi,
    I’m Polish and I love pączki. Yours looks very nice. I would taste them. We celebrate Fat Thursday (nothing but Fat Thursday, not Fat Tuesday, Friday etc.) eating lots of pączkis and faworki (angel wings) – you could try to make them too :-)
    P.S. The most popular filling for pączki is jam made from rose petals. Together with fluffy pączek it’s heavenly good! But we use also vanilla pudding, strawberry jam or soft chocolate.

    Reply

  45. Bernadette on February 27, 2014 at 5:06 pm

    I did some digging and I asked my boyfriend’s mom about Paczki and many many years ago when she was a little girl Pączki were rolled in sugar as you said. They also made Paczki without any filling. But now is as I said in my previous comment. So your recipe and explanation is very very true :)

    Reply

  46. Lily (A Rhubarb Rhapsody) on February 27, 2014 at 5:57 pm

    I too had never heard of paczki. They sound and look lovely. I love the readers suggestions of rose petal jam.

    Reply

  47. Jaclyn on February 28, 2014 at 12:34 pm

    I have GOT to try these! I’m obsessed with doughnuts but I’ve never made this kind. They look perfect!

    Reply

  48. Carrie Jones on February 28, 2014 at 3:50 pm

    I am dying right now. This makes me realize I need to get back in the kitchen baking again.

    Reply

  49. Tanya Thomas on February 28, 2014 at 7:48 pm

    Hi…

    I am amazed at your talent! My daughter is moving her bakery (in Nevada) to a location that will allow her to have a fryer. Can you tell me what kind of donut maker you have. Thanks so much for all your wonderful posts!

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 28th, 2014 at 11:03 pm

      Hi Tanya, I’m not sure what you mean by donut maker? I just cut them out with a round biscuit cutter and fried them in my 12″ cast iron skillet. I hope that helps!

      Reply

  50. Rachel on February 28, 2014 at 9:47 pm

    Was recently in Warsaw where I sampled many different paczki! The traditional ones are filled with rose jam, and sometimes topped with candied orange rind; it’s so wonderfully fragrant! They were also glazed and not rolled in granulated or powdered sugar!

    Reply

Comment Pages 1 2

Leave a Comment





(Your comment may need to be approved before it will appear on the site. Thanks for your patience! If it is your first time commenting you may want to review the Comment Guidelines.)