Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread]

Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread] by @browneyedbaker :: www.browneyedbaker.com

I’m not sure where I heard about panettone bread for the first time, but I was surprised at never having tasted this traditional Italian Christmas bread before. When I asked my mom about it, she said that my grandma used to make it all the time for the holidays (in coffee cans!), but that after my grandpap died, no one really asked for it anymore, so she stopped making it. It’s such a shame, because I know I would have gobbled it up year after year. If you’ve never heard of it before, panettone is a sweet bread loaded with candied citron, lemon zest and raisins, and baked in a cylindrical mold, which gives it a distinctive look. Now that I’ve made it, I realize what a holiday treasure this bread is to so many families.

Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread] by @browneyedbaker :: www.browneyedbaker.com

Knowing that I wanted to make it for Christmas this year, I started researching panettone recipes some time ago. I had a hard time finding any that looked like clear-cut “winners”, so I did some trial and error. I had a particularly awful experience with one that called for a week-long starter. On Day #4, the starter smelled like the unfortunate aftermath of a college freshman drinking a bit too much jungle juice. Yikes. Seriously, that was NOT a good morning. (It was also the day before Thanksgiving, and I spent a ridiculous amount of time burning candles and spraying Lysol into the air to try to eradicate the awful smell.)

After that, I started reading tons of blogs, forums and message boards to see what I could find about my elusive panettone. I discovered more than one reference to a recipe printed in the December 2008 edition of Gourmet Magazine. After a little more digging, I found that Andrea Meyers had made it, and just a few clicks later, I found an actual pdf of the magazine article on Sullivan Street Bakery’s website; it was actually the owner, Jim Lahey, who created the recipe. I knew immediately that it looked like the type of recipe that could be “the one” and carved out time to make it.

Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread] by @browneyedbaker :: www.browneyedbaker.com

This recipe makes a beautiful, soft, supple dough that is much like a brioche. Added to the dough is half of a vanilla bean (which is removed before baking), rum-soaked raisins, and candied orange peel. This bread is a true show-stopper. It’s stunning, and the flavor lives up to its looks. The bread is incredibly soft and sweet, and just loaded with flavor thanks to the vanilla bean, lemon zest, raisins and candied orange peel.

Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread] by @browneyedbaker :: www.browneyedbaker.com

While I found this to be a very easy dough to mix together and work with, the recipe does take some time to pull together, so you need to plan ahead. I used Andrea’s guide and it worked out perfectly for me:

Day 1 AM: Soak the raisins

Day 1 PM: Prepare the dough

Overnight: Rise 12-15 hours

Day 2 AM: Second rise

Day 2 PM: Bake

There are a few specialized items you need for this recipe, which include panettone molds (source: King Arthur Flour), candied citron (source: candied orange peel or candied mixed peel, both from King Arthur Flour), and metal skewers for hanging the cooling bread.

Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread] by @browneyedbaker :: www.browneyedbaker.com

I’ll be honest, I thought this was totally crazy when I first saw it in the original recipe. Jim Lahey says that by piercing the just-out-of-the-oven bread with skewers and hanging it upside down, it keeps the bread from collapsing while it cools. While skeptical, I followed the recipe and was pleasantly surprised when my bread didn’t tear through the skewers and end up in the bottom of the pot. I don’t have metal skewers, but I had enormous wooden skewers that I had bought for s’mores back in the summer, so I just used those and they seemed to work just fine.

The only issue I had during baking was that one quadrant of the top actually drooped so far over that it fell off during baking (you can see in the photos above that one section is lighter than the rest of the top). The finished product didn’t seem any worse for the wear, as it browned again just fine. Plus, I had a bit to nibble on while the entire loaf cooled ;-)

Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread] by @browneyedbaker :: www.browneyedbaker.com

My Chief Culinary Consultant and I ate half of this loaf in just two days. Fabulous doesn’t even begin to describe it. I’m planning on making two more loaves before Christmas – one for each of our families – and I just might make a third for the two of us to continue to enjoy into the New Year. I may have not grown up on this bread, but it’s something that I’m going to make a part of our Christmas tradition moving forward. I wish my grandma could taste this and we could compare notes; I know she would love it!

Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread] by @browneyedbaker :: www.browneyedbaker.com

One year ago: Homemade Torrone
Two years ago: Gingerbread Men Cookies
Three years ago: Homemade Hot Cocoa Mix

Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread]

Yield: 1 (6-inch) loaf panettone

Prep Time: 28 hours (almost all inactive)

Cook Time: 1 hour to 1 hour 15 minutes

Total Time: 2 days

A recipe for Panettone, Italian Christmas bread, with a brioche-like dough infused with a vanilla bean and studded with rum-soaked raisins and candied orange peel.

Ingredients:

1 cup raisins
2 tablespoons light rum
2 tablespoons hot water
3¾ all-purpose flour
⅔ cup granulated sugar
½ teaspoon active dry yeast
½ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon lemon zest
½ vanilla bean, split in half lengthwise
3 eggs, at room temperature
⅔ cup tepid water
1 tablespoon honey
10½ tablespoons unsalted butter, well softened
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, chilled
⅔ cup candied citron (I used candied orange peel) in ¼-inch pieces

Special Equipment:
Panettone molds (6x4½-inch) - purchased at King Arthur Flour
12-inch metal or wooden skewers

Directions:

1. In a small bowl, combine the raisins with the rum and 2 tablespoons of hot water. Allow to soak at room temperature, stirring occasionally, until the raisins are plump and most of the liquid has been absorbed, at least 8 hours or overnight.

2. In a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, mix together the flour, sugar, yeast, salt, lemon zest and vanilla bean on low speed until combined. In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, tepid water and honey. With the mixer on low speed, pour the egg mixture into the flour mixture. Increase the speed to medium-low and mix until all of the ingredients are combined. Add the softened butter, 1 tablespoon at a time, mixing until incorporated before adding more. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat until the dough is smooth and elastic, about 8 minutes.

3. Drain the raisins, discard the soaking liquid, and stir together with the candied citron and 1 tablespoon of melted butter. Stir this mixture into the dough with a wooden spoon.

4. Place the dough in a large bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a cold oven with the door closed until it has nearly tripled in volume, 12 to 15 hours.

5. Locate and discard the vanilla bean, then sprinkle the dough lightly with flour and scrape out onto a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle a bit more flour onto the dough, then fold the edges of the dough in towards the center, forming a loose ball, and place, seam-side down, into the panettone mold. Cover with a damp kitchen towel (not terry cloth) and let rise in a draft-free place at warm room temperature until the dough is just above the top of the mold, 3 to 5 hours.

6. Preheat oven to 370 degrees F.

7. Place the dough-filled panettone mold on a baking sheet. Use a very sharp serrated knife to score an "X" across the entire surface of the dough. Place the 1 tablespoon chilled butter in the center of the X and bake until a wooden skewer inserted into the center comes out slightly moist but not wet, 60 to 75 minutes (the panettone will be very dark).

8. Remove from the oven and pierce 12-inch metal or wooden skewers all the way through the panettone (including the paper) 4 inches apart and 1 inch from the bottom so the skewers are parallel. Hang the panettone upside down over a large stockpot and cool completely before cutting. To store the panettone, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, then either place in a resealable plastic bag, or wrap again in foil. The bread will keep at room temperature for up to 1 week. (I have not tried freezing the bread, but I believe it would freeze well, wrapped in plastic, then foil, then placed in a resealable bag.)

(Recipe from Jim Lahey of Sullivan Street Bakery, originally printed in Gourmet, December 2008)

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132 Responses to “Panettone [Italian Christmas Bread]”

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  1. Gry on December 11, 2013 at 12:23 am

    In Switzerland we get Panettone everywhere, but I’ve never tried to make it myself. I’m Norwegian, so we make our “own” version, called julebrød, which is basically a sweet bread dough with raisins and sometimes candied fruits.
    I might try this recipe to compare.

    Reply

  2. Kristin @ Bake Something on December 11, 2013 at 12:31 am

    Wow it’s beautiful! Gonna have to give it a try. :)

    Reply

  3. Averie @ Averie Cooks on December 11, 2013 at 1:14 am

    What a gorgeous finished loaf but sounds like quite the nightmare to get there….jungle juice and candles, whoa, that says it all :) Looks like it was worth it though based on that amazing fluffy texture!

    Reply

  4. Kate Flint on December 11, 2013 at 1:32 am

    I LOVE Panettone Bread at Xmas time, but I have never thought of making it myself! I always thought it would be too difficult, but I think I could definitely manage it! Thank you for inspiring :) My grandmother had the BEST Christmas pudding of all time that she got off a friend and tweaked a little for her own tastes. Thinking I should post it up and share the love this Christmas!

    Thanks again :)

    Reply

  5. Aimee on December 11, 2013 at 3:28 am

    OMG I love panettone. God I can’t wait for Christmas now :)

    Reply

  6. Penny on December 11, 2013 at 6:34 am

    I bet your Grandma was right there with you as you made it. :)

    Reply

  7. Dawn DeRosa on December 11, 2013 at 6:58 am

    That is beautiful! Can’t wait to try it. This is a traditional Italian gift, along with a bottle of vino. By the end of the holiday, we end up with a month’s worth of pannettone. Can this be made with chocolate chips? The grown ups love the citrone, but the kids always run for the chocolate version. Your recipes always are from the heart, encompassing our Italian famiglia traditions. Love it!

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 11th, 2013 at 1:00 pm

      Hi Dawn, I think chocolate chips would work!

      Reply

      • Mary on December 3rd, 2014 at 5:38 pm

        I think the mini chocolate chips would probably work better, because the regular ones can sometimes make the dough too heavy in spots, where the minis are more evenly spread around.

        Reply

  8. Jennifer @ Peanut Butter and Peppers on December 11, 2013 at 7:26 am

    I just had Panettone bread for the first time yesterday and i loved it! Then today you post this recipe! I guess it was meant to be! I have to make this, this weekend! Thank you so much for sharing!

    Reply

  9. Lori on December 11, 2013 at 7:32 am

    Michelle, your Panetonne looks beautiful and I bet it tastes even better! I am half German and my Great-grandfather was from the black forest region of Germany and owned a bakery. I make his stollen recipe every year at Christmas, It is a big hit with my MIL and BIL. It wouldn’t be Christmas to me until the Springerles and Stollen are made.

    Reply

  10. McKenzie on December 11, 2013 at 7:32 am

    Panettone bread pudding recipe, please! My sister-in-law made some last Christmas, and it was heavenly!

    Reply

  11. Belinda@themoonblushbaker on December 11, 2013 at 8:02 am

    I have yet to make panettone, i have always been intimated by it size and fruit soaking. Stale panettone makes the best TRIFLE CAKE! I really hope you try it

    Reply

  12. nancy K on December 11, 2013 at 8:14 am

    I love panettone. It is, by far, my very favorite sweet bread. I never have attempted to make it but I will now. When I was teaching kindergarten, I would read the book “Tony’s Bread” by prolific childrens’ author,Tomie dePaola. Tomie put his spin on the history of the bread in a humorous and fun way. After reading and discussing the story, I would share a loaf of the bread with the class. The following is the summary of the book from Amazon:
    How did panettone , the rich Italian Christmas bread, get its name? With tongue firmly in cheek, dePaola provides this confection as a reply. Chubby Serafina, the baker Antonio’s daughter, spends her days eating candy and weeping by the window. For although her father adores her and gives her the best of everything, Tony is convinced there is no man worthy of her. Then Angelo, a wealthy nobleman, falls in love with Serafina and enlists the help of three meddlesome “aunties” to win her father’s approval. In return for Serafina’s hand in marriage, Angelo sets Tony up in his own bakery in Milano, where he becomes wonderfully rich and famous from sales of an unusually shaped bread: pan di Tonio , or panettone . The tale is a typically charming dePaolian effort, and the illustrations abound with his trademark coziness. Another nice touch: like Tony’s currant-filled buns, the story is sprinkled with Italian words and phrases, translations of which are cleverly woven into the text. Ages 4-8.

    Reply

  13. Beth B on December 11, 2013 at 8:29 am

    I’ve tried quite a few times to make panettone and have had no success and some of the other recipes I’ve found are soooo labor intensive. This one definitely looks doable and I still have a few molds left so here goes nothing! Thanks :)

    Reply

  14. Nancy Long on December 11, 2013 at 9:01 am

    have always wanted to try making it, but is there any other type pan you can use? Just really don’t have the storage space for another speciality pan, thanks.

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 11th, 2013 at 1:01 pm

      Hi Nancy, This isn’t actually a pan; they are paper disposable molds. My mom said that my grandma used to bake hers in empty (clean) coffee cans.

      Reply

      • Nancy Long on December 11th, 2013 at 2:45 pm

        Thank you, will check on ordering some of the molds

        Reply

  15. Terry Hutchinson on December 11, 2013 at 9:15 am

    Here in the deep South we don’t see too much of this bread but I had noticed it few years ago around this time of year at our Publix. I certainly hope it is as good as it looks because it does seem very labor intensive!
    Merry Christmas!

    Reply

  16. Andrea on December 11, 2013 at 9:39 am

    I’m so glad you posted this! I’ve had Pannetone every year at Christmastime, but never homemade. The store-bought ones really vary in quality and freshness. This is going on my must-try list!

    Reply

  17. Jennifer on December 11, 2013 at 9:41 am

    I adore panettone! There’s a bakery on the Wharf in San Francisco that makes it year-round, and I always pick some up when I’m there.

    Reply

    • Anna on January 20th, 2014 at 8:14 am

      Jennifer, would you by any chance know the name of that bakery???

      Reply

  18. Claudia on December 11, 2013 at 10:02 am

    Panettone is delish. Haven’t made it yet. Thanks for the info on where to purchase the molds.

    Reply

  19. Kathy on December 11, 2013 at 10:06 am

    Sounds delish, but I have a problem. There is no way I can make something with raisins and have certain people in my house eat it. Any ideas for what can sub for the raisins. I know that it will no longer be authentic, but I would love to cook a “version” of the bread. Thanks.

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 11th, 2013 at 1:02 pm

      Hi Kathy, Without knowing what your family WILL eat, it’s hard for me to make suggestions ;-) You could try any other type of dried fruit – dried cherries, dried cranberries, currants, chopped dates, etc.

      Reply

  20. Molly @Bakelette on December 11, 2013 at 10:16 am

    Fantastic pictures! I have wanted to try making this for sometime! I have had the fiori di sicilia flavoring in my fridge for over a year! And I love that you’re making it a new tradition for you and your consultant!!

    Reply

  21. Pennie D. on December 11, 2013 at 10:20 am

    I have always wanted to make Panettone but I was always scared that the recipe would be bad, so I never tried it. I am going to try this one. It looks so amazing and delicious. Look out King Arthur Flour.

    Reply

  22. rina on December 11, 2013 at 10:27 am

    I love beautiful special traditional breads at Christmas. They are beautiful to look at and the taste of something that is not peppermint, chocolate, nutty, or candy in taste and texture is so much more delightful and comforting. My Norwegian grandmother and mother made julekake every season. Eating at room temperature or toasted with butter was so good. I just wanted to keep smelling the bottle of real cardamon and wish I could have it everyday. The pleasant activity of making these breads is worth every minute of time!

    Reply

  23. Diane W. on December 11, 2013 at 10:30 am

    If you end up or make extras, Barefoot Contessa has a recipe for a Panettone bread pudding that always looked amazing.

    Reply

  24. Nancy P.@thebittersideofsweet on December 11, 2013 at 10:41 am

    Can I just tell you that when I saw this I thought I would cry. I know silly but here is why, my husband is from Italy and every year we look all over for panettone, we buy it, we eat it, we enjoy it. The best years is when my mother in law actually ships us some from Italy. But to think that I could make this for him and he might feel a little bit of home on holidays when he is away from home makes me want to run and find all of these ingredients immediately. Thank you so much for making this!! I think it would be the best gift for him.

    Reply

  25. Melissa @ Treats With a Twist on December 11, 2013 at 10:47 am

    SO exciting to see the results after seeing it hanging around on your IG! Makes me wonder how your grandma cooled hers if she made them in cans? Propped upsidedown?
    Well it always has looked beautiful to me so now I know all the time and love that goes into it!

    Reply

  26. Karen on December 11, 2013 at 10:50 am

    Last comment by me, not “rina”. I wondered who rina was but I am easily distracted!

    Reply

  27. Rosene S on December 11, 2013 at 11:03 am

    Looks so good. I have only tried the store bought kind

    Reply

  28. annie on December 11, 2013 at 11:44 am

    Wow Michelle, your panettone looks so professional. We’re lucky that where I live in Canada, we are able to get these at every grocery and specialty store around.They have different flavors, like lemon, chocolate, pandoro,and many more. That is quite an undertaking, comgratulations.

    Reply

  29. derek on December 11, 2013 at 12:42 pm

    Absolutely love your site.. Plus I get tons of bonus points from my wife every time I make one of your recipes!! This bread looks amazing, definitely be making it soon.

    Reply

  30. Petra on December 11, 2013 at 1:17 pm

    Are you sure you baked this?? Looks absolutely store-bought!?!?

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2013 at 10:00 am

      Yes, I am sure that I baked this. I guess I did a good job?!

      Reply

      • Petra on December 14th, 2013 at 4:01 am

        Well, I’m not sure. Because normally home-made does’t look like store-bought, it’s supposed to look better. I live in Switzerland, one part of which is Italian, so we have lots of panettones here at this time. And even those, which are baked in bakeries doesn’t look like store bought, but better. So I’m still not convinced :)

        Reply

        • Michelle on December 14th, 2013 at 10:50 am

          My job is not to convince you that something I made is actually something I made. I have over 1,000 recipes documented on this site over seven years, all of which I have made and photographed in my own kitchen. Merry Christmas.

          Reply

  31. ariana on December 11, 2013 at 1:24 pm

    Thanks Michelle for posting this. I too have tried to make this in the past, with no luck. I have 2 questions. Do you know what internal temp this should be, when fully baked? Also, sometimes my dough rises faster than the recommended rising time. Should I move on to the next step, or wait? Ive never known if “over rising” causes a problem. Thank you! Buon natale!

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 11th, 2013 at 11:25 pm

      Hi Ariana, If your dough rises faster, then move on to the next step when it has gotten to the correct point. You can “over-rise” dough, which I’ve done before. It develops too much air and basically collapses.

      Reply

  32. Lizzy (Good Things) on December 11, 2013 at 2:19 pm

    Hi Michelle… I’m sitting here reading this, drinking my macchiato and wishing I could tear off a large slab to enjoy with my coffee. Love that you did so much research! I have not yet made panettone, but it’s on the list, so I’m booking marking your recipe. Pinned too! Season’s eatings to you. xo

    Reply

  33. Jessica @ Portuguese Girl Cooks on December 11, 2013 at 4:05 pm

    Your panettone turned out fabulous! I absolutely love panettone this time of year and must admit that it is always something that I always buy but never really thought of making. I must give this a try sometime soon!

    Reply

  34. Agos on December 11, 2013 at 4:13 pm

    Panettone is a staple here in Argentina :) We call it pan dulce and flavor it with orange blossom water. I’ve made it a few times, though I’ve never done the hanging upside down part! I’ve seen it on some recipes on the internet though, but it doesn’t make much sense to me. Why would the bread collapse as it cools?
    Oh and my the way, you should try adding nuts!

    Reply

  35. Kari@Loaves n Dishes on December 11, 2013 at 4:25 pm

    I’m not a lover of Panetonne, but I suspect it’s because I’ve only ever had the store bought; there’s just something not right to me about a bread that can last for months. I have a feeling that this Panetonne will convert me to a Panetonne lover!

    Reply

  36. Martha in KS on December 11, 2013 at 6:44 pm

    You mean people actually MAKE their own panettone? You continue to amaze me. I just bought two loaves at World Market – I love it for french toast. It lasts a long time.

    Reply

  37. Lucia Gentile on December 11, 2013 at 6:47 pm

    I find it hard to believe that the picture you posted is your finished product.
    I have bought panettone for the past 50 years and I can assure you that this
    looks very much like the Motta panettone. It would be nice to see your
    finished product.

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2013 at 10:05 am

      My finished product is all pictured above. I am not familiar with the different brands of panettone, but if it looks like a legitimate panettone, I guess this recipe was a success!

      Reply

      • Penny on December 12th, 2013 at 2:57 pm

        In addition to your skill I think King Arthur supplies make baked goods look
        very professional. At one time these things weren’t always available to everyone
        so maybe this is what has caused suspicion.

        Reply

    • Petra on December 14th, 2013 at 4:05 am

      I absolutely agree.

      Reply

  38. Rose on December 11, 2013 at 8:18 pm

    I must agree with Lucia, this is not home made. It’s not easy to make panettone…as a born and raised Italian married to a Milanese (Panettone Motta, Milano LOL) I know panettone.

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2013 at 10:14 am

      Rose, Just because something is difficult doesn’t mean that it’s impossible, or that people won’t aspire to do it. I guess since you make it sound so infeasible and you know panettone, I should be pretty darn excited about having made it!

      Reply

  39. joan on December 11, 2013 at 10:37 pm

    am Italian and a panettone fanatic! glad you discovered it

    Reply

  40. Maria on December 11, 2013 at 10:59 pm

    I bet this is fantastic if it’s a Jim Lahey recipe. I use his pizza dough that rises for 18 hours and has the BEST taste and texture of the dozen or so pizza dough recipes I’ve tried.

    Reply

  41. Dina on December 12, 2013 at 7:39 am

    what a beautiful panettone!

    Reply

  42. Denise Browning@From Brazil To You on December 12, 2013 at 10:27 am

    Hi, Michelle! Thanks for such a fantastic recipe. Although panettone is a tradition in my home country, I confess that I’ve never made one. I always buy it but since I have a trustworthy recipe from your blog, I can finally make my own panettone. I usually use it to prepare other dishes such as my recent upside-down panettone French toast. Wishing you a very Merry Christmas!

    Reply

  43. Liz on December 12, 2013 at 11:21 am

    Well done for having persevered and made the genuine article Panettone! I was in the mood last Christmas to make one but when I discovered it took around two days and that double rising business, I made a cheats version but I have to say it wasn’t the same thing. I am away in the UK, from my adopted home Malta this Xmas so won’t be trying it but will bookmark your recipe. We get inundated with panettone here as we’re neighbours to Italy and share the same cuisine. They are soooo cheap, it does take some effort to want to make one, but nothing like a challenge, heh? Two years ago, we stayed a few days in mid December right by one of Rome’s most famed bakeries – Roscioli. Through our flatlet wall, we were woken at 2am by the bread machines whirring. They were churning out the most amazing Panettone by the hundreds. At an expense I have to say! But we could smell it wafting in to our room. Amazing experience and gives me fond memories of the ur-alt, Panettone Roman style!

    Reply

  44. Jane on December 12, 2013 at 3:21 pm

    I have been following your blog for years and am astounded at the repeated comments from people saying they doubt you made this bread yourself. I get it, panettone is fussy and hard for casual bakers to get right. But you’re beyond the “casual baker” in terms of skill and experience, and you were honest about previous attempts that didn’t work out. Your recipes and photos are so consistently good that I would be far more surprised by a bad panettone than a good one.

    Reply

    • nancy K on December 12th, 2013 at 7:47 pm

      I totally agree, Jane. I love Michelle’s blog, recipes and writing. I think if both Rose and Lucia, the self-proclaimed panetotone experts, look again at the photos, they will see that the loaf is somewhat imperfect in shape…a bit lopsided and overflowing the pan This is never the case of a store bought panettone.Those are made on a production line by machinery that allows for little if an variation in the loaves. This clearly is homemade and looks divine. Great job Michelle…thanks for sharing your expertise!

      Reply

    • Petra on December 14th, 2013 at 4:11 am

      This is not about experience. Home made product never looks like one you can buy in supermarket. This is store-bought panettone, I’m pretty positive.

      Reply

      • Petra on December 14th, 2013 at 4:23 am

        Plus, look at the pictures of Andrea Meyers. That panettone looks absolutely different, the consistency. (And mold used here is not the one from King Arthur Flour.) This here is definitely store bought panettone.

        Reply

        • Michelle on December 14th, 2013 at 11:10 am

          I cannot speak to how Andrea made hers; all kitchens differ, as do air temperature and humidity levels, which affects how yeast develops and how final products look. Yes, that mold IS the one from King Arthur Flour, which I purchased here: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/panettone-papers-set-of-12. As you can see in both Andrea’s post and the Jim Lahey recipe, the same molds are used (probably because Jim Lahey actually lists those particular molds from King Arthur Flour).

          Reply

      • gracie on December 14th, 2013 at 10:55 am

        I really cannot believe how incredibly rude you are. Why would any legitimate blogger post a picture of a store bought product along with a recipe for that product? Michelle does this for a living and has established herself and her reputation in the blogging community. Anyone who follows this blog knows Michelle to be open and honest about what she bakes and how things come together. What purpose would it serve for her to be/do anything less? Why would anyone believe you? Are you are established, reputable blogger? I certainly have never heard of you.
        Store bought products, especially panettone, come off a mass machinery based production line. Quite contrary to that you say, there is very little variation in shape or consistency. Home made products are often or almost always much less perfect…especially ones that are yeast based. There is no way to constantly monitor a yeast based product as there is in a wholesale bakery. The shape of Michelle’s panettone is not perfect and is clearly homemade. …it is lopsided and in one shot, is overflowing the side of the pan. Read the post…clearly this is home baked.

        Reply

  45. DeLynn on December 12, 2013 at 6:23 pm

    I had some Panettone for the first time last night and it is very yummy! This morning I sliced it into somewhat thick slices and made french toast with it for my boyfriend. talk about YUMMY!!!

    Reply

  46. Debbie L on December 13, 2013 at 9:43 am

    Cheers to the browneyedbaker! There is nothing she won’t try! I love your recipes. I read your blog each and every morning.

    Reply

  47. Fran@fransfavs.com on December 13, 2013 at 12:08 pm

    Michelle–talk about perfect timing! I went to Mario Batali’s new Italian emporium “Eataly” in Chicago last week with Italian restaurants galore and every imaginable Italian food product for sale, both fresh and packaged. When I saw that they were selling a package of panettone for slightly over $30 (yikes!), I decided I needed to look for a recipe. Before I had a chance, here you’ve done the legwork for me! I must say that is one spectacularly beautiful loaf–you’ve outdone yourself! Hope I can measure up. :-)

    Reply

  48. Effie on December 14, 2013 at 5:05 am

    It’s so beautiful! I will definitely try this before Christmas ^^

    Reply

  49. Silvia on December 14, 2013 at 1:29 pm

    It really looks delicious. The kind of soft dough that bounces back when you touch it, not too sweet but very fragrant. Though I’m not a fan on candied oranges. Being Italian I understand why some people have a hard time believing you made it at home, but that’s probably because we’re surrounded by professional bakers telling us that it’s impossible to do it at home without the proper equipment. I have been following your blog for a long time and know of your amazing skills in the kitchen. I’ll be waiting for you to make Pandoro next ;)

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  50. Sharon Hansen on December 14, 2013 at 2:05 pm

    My husbands family is half Italian. His mom doesn’t really enjoy baking if memory serves me right. I do. I’m going to make this for Christmas and surprise them. Should be fun! I love trying new things.

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