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Homemade Torrone

Growing up in an Italian family, torrone was as much a part of our nomenclature as traditional snacks like pretzels or potato chips. My mom once told me that growing up, my grandfather (who had come over from Italy when he was 18) always made sure there were two things in the pantry – boxes of torrone and a big bottle of Brioschi. A true Italian, indeed! I was always smitten with the beautiful little boxes that the individual candies came in – they were colorful and had some some of the most unique designs. Inside are little rectangular candies, made of a sweet nougat and studded with nuts. The most traditional version is made with almonds, but I have also seen versions with pistachios, and also simply flavored with lemon, vanilla bean or orange.

While I’ve enjoyed torrone occasionally since I was a child, I’ve really grown to like and appreciate it over the last few years. Admittedly, it was never something that I had ever thought to make myself until I was flipping through the new DIY Cookbook from America’s Test Kitchen and opened a page to homemade almond torrone. I was blown away not only to find it there in the book, but to discover just how easy it is to make! There are a couple of specialty-type items that you need for the recipe, like edible wafer paper and blanched almonds, which my local grocery stores don’t carry, so I ordered online (see notes below recipe for links). I should note that regular almonds would work, but I wanted to make this as authentic as possible. Once you have the wafer paper and blanched almonds, the rest is smooth sailing.

I was so excited to take my first bite of the torrone, and even more thrilled when I realized that it tasted just like authentic torrone! This is definitely something that I’ll be making from scratch from now on; there’s no reason not to, and it adds an extra-special touch for holidays. I’m excited for my Chief Culinary Consultant’s dad to get into town on Friday for Christmas – he loves torrone, so there’s a big container with his name on it!

One year ago: Sticky Toffee Pudding
Three years ago: Date Nut Spice Bread

Homemade Torrone

Yield: Approximately 16 to 20 pieces

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

A recipe for homemade torrone - an Italian candy made of nougat and almonds.

Ingredients:

2 to 3 edible wafer papers (see note below)
3 egg whites
¼ teaspoon cream of tartar
½ cup honey
2 cups granulated sugar
⅛ teaspoon salt
3 cups (15 ounces) whole blanched almonds (see note below)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Spray an 8-inch square baking pan with non-stick cooking spray. Line the bottom and sides of the pan with edible wafer paper, cutting pieces as needed to get them to fit; set aside.

2. Place the egg whites and cream of tartar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment; set aside.

3. Place the honey in a medium saucepan. Pour the sugar and salt into the center of the pan. Cook the mixture over medium heat, without stirring, until the honey starts to boil around the edges of the pan, about 5 minutes.

4. Reduce the heat to medium-low and cook, gently swirling the pan, until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture is dark amber in color and reaches 320 degrees F on a thermometer, anywhere from about 8 to 12 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and let the bubbles subside, about 30 seconds.

5. Meanwhile, when the honey mixture is at about 270 degrees F, turn the mixer to medium-low and begin whipping the egg whites and cream of tartar until foamy, about 1 minute. Increase the speed to medium-high and whip until soft peaks form, about 2 to 3 more minutes.

6. Reduce the speed to low and carefully add the hot honey mixture, trying to avoid the sides of the bowl and the whisk as much as possible, and mix until incorporated. Increase the speed to medium and whip, scraping down the sides of the bowl twice, until the mixture is pale and very thick and stiff, about 10 to 12 minutes.

7. While the candy mixture is whipping, spread the almonds on a rimmed baking sheet and heat until warm and just barely fragrant, about 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the oven and keep the almonds on the baking sheet to keep warm.

8. Reduce the mixer speed to low and add the warm almonds and vanilla to the candy mixture. Working quickly, scrape the candy evenly into the prepared pan using a rubber spatula that has been sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Cover the top surface of the candy with a single piece of edible wafer paper, trimmed to fit the pan. Place parchment paper on top and press very firmly with another 8-inch square baking pan to compact the candy and remove air bubbles. Let the pan cool to room temperature, about 1 hour. Refrigerate until very firm, about 2 hours.

9. Discard the parchment. Use a paring knife to trim any excess pieces of edible wafer paper from the edges, then turn the candy out onto a cutting board. Cut the torrone into pieces about 1x2-inches. The torrone can be stored at room temperature or refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks, using parchment to line the container and separate layers.

Note: Below are the links to the specialty items I purchased for the torrone:

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69 Responses to “Homemade Torrone”

  1. Joni Thompson on December 12, 2012 at 4:58 am

    The torrone looks amazing! I wonder if I could make it without a stand mixer?

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2012 at 10:36 am

      Hi Joni, Do you have a hand mixer? It would be virtually impossible to get the candy mixture whipped enough just using a hand whisk and elbow grease. Even with a hand mixer, it might be hard, but it may work.

      Reply

      • Joni Thompson on December 12th, 2012 at 1:45 pm

        I do have a hand mixer. I just haven’t taken the plunge to invest in a stand mixer. If I can manage marshmellows with my hand mixer, maybe I can do these, too!

        Reply

  2. Maria on December 12, 2012 at 5:51 am

    My Italian family would go wild over this! It has gotten so expensive and those little boxes of torrone get smaller every year. I have to try this, thanks.

    Reply

  3. MaryBeth on December 12, 2012 at 6:13 am

    Growing up, my Zia Thersa always gave us a box of Torrones. When we were kids we thought they were so fancy in that yellow box with all the royal-looking faces. We would always try to peel the wafer off in one piece. I just might need to try to make these with my sister over the holidays.

    Reply

  4. Laura on December 12, 2012 at 7:24 am

    I never knew what this was called, but I buy it at one of my local stores. So happy to have a recipe now! I’ve had a chocolate variety too. Any ideas on adding chocolate?It’s very mild (the chocolate torrone I bought, and that seems to work well, rather than a dark, deep chocolate). I will definitely make this (and experiment with some of the flavorings/nut suggestions). Love your blog!

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2012 at 10:36 am

      Hi Laura, I’ve actually never tasted chocolate torrone! I’ll have to do some digging around and see if I can find a chocolate version to taste and do some experimenting. Thanks for the suggestion!

      Reply

      • Laura on December 12th, 2012 at 6:39 pm

        Hi Michelle: I checked and the brand is Ferrara. I believe the chocolate version comes in a bar (but its not chocolate covered). The one I buy is shaped in a triangle with the bottom layer chocolate almond and the top layer vanilla almond all wrapped in pretty cellophane and tied with a gold bow. But I believe they have both in the plain bars too. They are very generous with the almonds, which I love.

        Reply

  5. Navar on December 12, 2012 at 8:41 am

    Love the Torrone reciepe! I used to live in RI and was able to get this at the bakeries there. Now that I’m in GA I have not been able to find it… I will have to make some as soon as I an get the “paper”.

    Reply

  6. Annie @ Annie's City Kitchen on December 12, 2012 at 9:37 am

    Wow, I’ve never even heard of Torrone! These look so unique though. So excited to see something completely brand new to me!

    Reply

  7. Jen on December 12, 2012 at 9:46 am

    I have been dying to make my own Torrone for years and I think now I’m going to try it. Thanks for the inspiration!

    Reply

  8. Lori Moss on December 12, 2012 at 9:48 am

    I tasted Torrance for the first time about six years ago. It was pistachio flavored and I’ve always wanted to try making it! It is one of the best things I have ever eaten!

    Reply

    • Lori Moss on December 12th, 2012 at 9:49 am

      Crazy spellcheck! I meant Torrone, of course! It may just be one of those days today!

      Reply

      • Lucia C(uffetelli on December 12th, 2012 at 11:58 am

        Lori, sorry, just a side note. Had to laugh…I don’t live too far from “Torrance” (CA), so I got a kick out of your spellcheck error, LOL! :)

        Reply

  9. David on December 12, 2012 at 9:54 am

    You’re not really tied to the almond if you can’t find them. Hazelnuts work well, and my favorite is pistachios. Another thing that I like is Torrone dipped in dark chocolate, which solves the stickiness problem.

    Reply

  10. Jennifer @ Peanut Butter and Peppers on December 12, 2012 at 9:54 am

    Wow! I haven’t had Torrone in mega years!! Looks amazing!!

    Reply

  11. Toni on December 12, 2012 at 9:59 am

    I am so happy I stumbled upon your web site. I too grew up with this delicious candy and we especially would enoy it on Christmas Eve at my Nana & Poppop’s house. Also along with the Brioschi at the end of the Christmas Eve feast. Thank you for sharing.

    Reply

  12. Dedra on December 12, 2012 at 10:33 am

    I have never tried or heard of Torrone but after ready your story and the comments below, I am going to make this.

    Reply

  13. Shundara@ SavyNaturalista on December 12, 2012 at 10:41 am

    I am so happy to see this recipe I love nougat and it has pistachios!!! I can not wait to give it a go..

    Reply

  14. Ariana on December 12, 2012 at 10:44 am

    Thanks for this! I love Torrone. Curious, does this version tend to stay soft and chewy or does it get sort of hard after a day or so? Also, I’ve always picked up a note of lemon zest or something in the ones I’ve had. Lastly, you missed 1 critical item of every Italian pantry – Chamomile tea, especially this brand http://www.doma-italian-market.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=527 ;) Buon Natale!

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2012 at 2:03 pm

      Hi Ariana, It stays soft, I have it stored in the refrigerator and it’s still soft when you bite into it. You could add a little lemon zest or a tiny bit of lemon extract in addition to the vanilla when you make it. I’ve tasted lemon versions, but have never felt that the “original” torrone candies had any lemon in them.

      Reply

  15. Michele on December 12, 2012 at 11:16 am

    Just curious Michelle, did you try to find the edible wafer & blanched almonds in the Strip District? I can’t imagine that they aren’t available down there. I always pick up Torrone at Penn Mac. I would love to be able to make my own, but candy thermometers intimidate me, and I still don’t have a stand mixer…ugh! :(

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2012 at 2:04 pm

      Hi Michele, No, I didn’t head down to the Strip before ordering the wafer paper and almonds (I don’t go down there too often, although I should!). I’m sure you could find the blanched almonds somewhere down there, but not sure about the wafer paper.

      Reply

  16. Lucia C(uffetelli on December 12, 2012 at 11:38 am

    Thanks for sharing your recipe! Growing up Italian, us kids looked forward to every time mom & dad brought home a box of torrone! I can’t really eat it now, because it’s way too sweet for me, but I would really love to make it for others, & give as gifts.

    Reply

  17. Christine on December 12, 2012 at 11:56 am

    I have never heard of this delectable Torrone! I will definitely try this! To BLANCH ALMONDS, it’s easy,, just put almonds into a glass measuring cup, add boiling water to just cover and then microwave, 1-2 minutes, depending on amount. The skins slip off so easily!

    Reply

  18. Marie | FeelingFoodish on December 12, 2012 at 11:59 am

    This looks like fun! I never even considered trying to make homemade torrone. I’m gonna show this to my mom. I wonder if she’s ever heard of making it. She watches RAI, the Italian channel, here in the US and is always watching the Italian cooking shows.

    Reply

  19. Sara on December 12, 2012 at 1:04 pm

    Did you use a paddle attachment or a whisk attachment?

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2012 at 2:59 pm

      Hi Sara, Per the recipe, you use a whisk attachment.

      Reply

      • Sara on December 12th, 2012 at 3:00 pm

        Oh it does say that! Sorry,missed that. Excited to try it out :D

        Reply

  20. lisa on December 12, 2012 at 1:12 pm

    This looks amazing! I have always wanted to make this but the lack of a stand mixer has always prevented me. I do wonder how the little Italian Grannies back in the olden days used to make it. There would have been no stand mixers then? Perhaps it was different?

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2012 at 2:59 pm

      Hi Lisa, I’m not sure! You could always try with a hand mixer.

      Reply

  21. Ashley @ Wishes and Dishes on December 12, 2012 at 1:15 pm

    I love Italian candy and cookies!

    Reply

  22. Teri on December 12, 2012 at 1:47 pm

    I remember eating this out of little boxes as a kid. I can’t wait to make this for my father for Christmas. Thank you for the information about where to find the wafer paper. I was just wondering ~ did you use a special technique to cut your Torrone? The edges look so clean and I picture this sticking to whatever I use to slice it.
    Thanks,
    Teri

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2012 at 3:02 pm

      Hi Teri, No special technique – I just used a really sharp knife, and rinsed and wiped it clean between each cut so it wouldn’t drag with the bits of torrone that ended up stuck to it.

      Reply

  23. Junglewife on December 12, 2012 at 6:29 pm

    This looks amazing. I grew up in South America and one of my most favorite treats was “turron”, the same as your “torrone”! What a treat to have a recipe! Unfortunately now I am going to have to figure out how to get some wafer paper… I live in Indonesia now and don’t think I am going to be able to find it here! Do you think I could do without???

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 12th, 2012 at 9:59 pm

      I don’t think it would be possible to do it without the wafer paper, unfortunately. The candy is so very sticky that without that barrier, I don’t think you could pry it out of the pan or even attempt to eat it. Maybe you can find something similar where you live?

      Reply

    • Penny on December 15th, 2012 at 7:02 am

      I wonder if a light greasing of the pan would work as when making marshmallows? The top I would try powdered sugar. I am only guessing.

      Reply

  24. Pam Venezia on December 12, 2012 at 7:42 pm

    I can’t wait to make this for my husband. It is his favorite candy according to his sister.

    Reply

  25. Sally - only gluten free baking on December 12, 2012 at 7:45 pm

    This looks like my favourite nougat that I get from the speciality/organic store. I might have to look closer next time and see if its Torrone. I’d love to make it from scratch, something for my New Year to do list.

    Reply

  26. Lesley Mc Intosh on December 12, 2012 at 11:49 pm

    Chocolate florentines

    Reply

  27. Maria Beto on December 12, 2012 at 11:51 pm

    O! My God! this is great! I grew up with this stuff! I am from Greece and there we call it “mandolato” (hmmm now that I think of it the word sounds very Italian :) so who knows…) I love this and I am so excited that you posted a recipe to make it at home! Thank you thank you. Greetings from Boston.

    Reply

  28. Ela on December 13, 2012 at 2:00 am

    Hi Michelle, I’ve eaten Torrone in the past, but they were not soft, they were as hard as a rock. May I know if we can make this w/o the edible wafer paper, if so, how do we do it? And can we put other nuts and fillings like cranberries and chocolate chips? Thanks.

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 13th, 2012 at 11:42 am

      Hi Ela, I don’t see how you could make these without the edible wafer paper, or a similar substitute. The mixture is just way too sticky, and I don’t think you’d be able to get actual pieces out of the pan, or really even eat them, without something to line them. I don’t see any reason why you couldn’t substitute other nuts or mix-ins for the almonds.

      Reply

  29. Jean on December 13, 2012 at 1:39 pm

    My grandma always made these for Christmas. I’m going to have to look around for the edible wafer stuff. Thanks so much for the recipe!

    Reply

    • Jean on December 23rd, 2012 at 10:34 pm

      I used spring roll wrappers. Not a very good shape to work with and I’m at the pre-refrigerator phase, so not sure how it turned out. Had to put a weight on it the top layer kept rolling up. Have a lot of wrappers left over, now I’ll have to try spring rolls! Otherwise, really easy to make and tastes just like my Spanish grandma made.

      Reply

      • Jean on December 24th, 2012 at 10:13 am

        Don’t use spring roll wrappers – too thick and sharp. I peeled them off and had this sticky mess. Covered in chocolate!

        Reply

  30. Caryn Jennings on December 13, 2012 at 5:06 pm

    Question on the edible rice paper, is it just to keep it from sticking, if so can you substitute foil or buttered parchment? If you don’t want to pay 20 bucks for the ream of paper from amazon or I just can’t wait for it to get here. Or is it more for the presentation so it has a nice smooth flat appearance?
    I did look for it at the Michael’s craft store and they didn’t carry it she sent me to a local bakery and they wanted 6 or 7 bucks for one sheet!
    Thank you for the inspiration to try and make it at home, I was admiring it in the grocery store and hadn’t splurged and bought some yet.

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 13th, 2012 at 11:07 pm

      Hi Caryn, I don’t think you could successfully substitute either parchment or foil in this case. Either one would stick to the candy and be virtually impossible to peel off in order to eat the candy. That’s why this edible wafer paper is used – it acts as a “cover” to the candy, but you can eat it as well. There’s no way you would be able to slice it, handle it, etc without something like that.

      Reply

      • Ela on December 14th, 2012 at 12:29 am

        I’ve googled some recipes and one suggested to use Filo the one you use for making Baklava others suggested to use cornstarch like when you’re making marshmallows which is sticky too. Not sure they will work with Torrone but there’s no harm in trying! I might try the cornstarch on a parchment paper first, we’ll see.

        Reply

  31. Greg on December 13, 2012 at 11:32 pm

    The paper can be found on eBay in smaller quanties than 100 sheets. As for the torrone being sticky when cooled, if you use a candy thermometer and cook the honey, sugar mixture to hard ball stage, when it sets up it will be hard candy. Experiment between the soft and hard to find what you prefer. The harder it is, the longer it will last. Remember, if you do cook to hard ball, cut it before it sets up or you will have one large piece to make broken torrone hard candy.

    Reply

  32. Danielle on December 14, 2012 at 12:57 pm

    My father said that was the best Torrone, he had! He only had 1 piece, mom had the rest!

    Reply

  33. Caryn Jennings on December 14, 2012 at 1:24 pm

    Great news! the price on the ream of edible wafer paper just dropped by 4 dollars to 15.99 on Amazon! Great time to try this! Much better deal than 6 or 7 dollars for one sheet from my local bakery!

    Reply

  34. Marina Laura on December 14, 2012 at 2:40 pm

    Omg! I love this! I eat a lot of those when I was child! Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply

  35. Nicole (MyLoveForCooking) on December 14, 2012 at 9:21 pm

    You just made me do a super happy dance! I LOVE this stuff and it is so hard to find. Thank you!! :)

    Reply

  36. Jan on December 15, 2012 at 3:20 am

    Wow! Torrone is one of my favorite candies at Christmas time! It is sooo good and so hard to find b/c I’ve seen it in one store. Once it’s gone that’s it b/c they only get a small quantity. Can you tell me if it’s 1 tsp or less of extract that can be added? I always ate the orange and lemon ones before the vanilla ones! Lol.

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 15th, 2012 at 11:01 pm

      Hi Jan, It’s 1 teaspoon of vanilla, but if you want to do orange or lemon I would probably use a little less, as those extracts tend to be more concentrated than vanilla.

      Reply

  37. Laura Dembowski on December 15, 2012 at 8:39 am

    I love torrone. It is so hard to find in the stores. I can’t wait to make my own.

    Reply

  38. Joy on December 18, 2012 at 1:56 am

    I have dying to try this candy. Where did you find the wafer paper?

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 18th, 2012 at 6:05 pm

      Hi Joy, If you check above at the bottom of the recipe, I provide a link to where I bought the wafer paper on Amazon.

      Reply

  39. Shianne on January 2, 2013 at 9:30 pm

    Every Christmas when I go to my BFF’s parents house I end up stealing the little boxes of Torrone because I love them so much. This year I have vowed to expand my candy making skills, and I’ll be making Torrone for my book club this weekend.

    Reply

  40. Bianka on January 14, 2013 at 7:36 am

    Beautiful and cozy blog!
    I found a picture in Pinterest …. and so I came to your blog
    Great recipe!

    Reply

  41. Annette on March 22, 2013 at 4:03 am

    I love your recipes, and have saved quite a number of them to use, especially the Italian ones! My Mum hails from Slovenia, near the Italian border, and authentic recipes from my childhood are hard to find (she cooked a number of goodies from Italy too), so if my stand mixer is up to the task (Mum disliked making nougat too often as she said it was such hard work for her machine), I would love to make this. I even remember the smell of blanching almonds off our own tree as I read your recipe! Your blog is delightful!

    Reply

  42. Carole on November 24, 2013 at 11:31 am

    In Ontario, Canada the wafer papers are sold at the Bulk Barn chain. .47 cents per sheet.

    Reply

  43. Christine Dalessio on December 2, 2013 at 8:03 pm

    SO HAPPY about this! It’s part of my childhood and so expensive to buy!
    I’d love to try it with pistachios, since that’s one of my favorite traditional ones… also orange and with candied fruits like orange or lemon (Sicilian).
    Wondering if I’d need to blanch some unsalted pistachios myself…

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 3rd, 2013 at 2:24 pm

      Hi Christine, I’m not sure if you’d need to blanch the pistachios, if you try your version, let me know how it turns out!

      Reply

  44. Stefania on December 6, 2013 at 12:04 pm

    I go crazy for hard torrone (the soft is just gross) and can’t wait to try this recipe! Thanks so much.

    Reply

  45. jEM on December 15, 2013 at 1:36 pm

    Hi there
    I have been looking laboriously for a very tasty, simple “lihgt and fluffy” nougat recipe and came across yours. There is just so much variation out there to recipes, it’s overwhelming! Your pictures look amazing and the nougat/torrone pieces look really nice and full bodied when cut. I just want to know, is the texture fluffy and light as well as soft? I know this probably sounds like a strange question, I hope you know what I mean though? Also, what size dish do you use to get the correct thickness and amount of pieces when cut? Thanks so much

    Reply

    • Michelle on December 16th, 2013 at 1:58 pm

      Yes, it does have a “light and fluffy” texture. Enjoy!

      Reply

  46. gioia di vivere on January 31, 2014 at 7:00 pm

    wow Thank you ! great soft torrone recipe, cant believe I can do this in the mixer! My old school Italian family stands over the stove MIXING and Mixing, but this was easy! It came out great, my husband right from Italy loves it. I find it a little too sweet I wonder how I could cut the sweetness? I have a soft chocolate torrone recipe from marshmellows, chocolate, and nuts which is also so easy if you want to try :-) Now I can give both chocolate and vanilla together as gifts.

    Reply

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