Grandma’s Roasted Potatoes

My grandma's legendary Sunday roasted potatoes | browneyedbaker.com #recipe

I’ve talked quite a bit in the past about my grandma’s Sunday dinners. It was a tradition for our family growing up, and one that provided my sister and I, and our cousins, with so many wonderful memories. I have such vivid memories of many of the staple items she would make on Sundays, and potatoes is high on that list. Along with at least one type of pasta, meat, and salad, my grandma made roasted potatoes. They have since come to be known simply as “Grandma’s potatoes”. Most Sundays she would have to make two batches because they’d disappear so quickly.

There was nothing inherently fancy about these potatoes – my grandma would hold a potato in one hand and cut off pieces with a paring knife, throw some olive oil in the pan, a little bit of seasoning, and then put them in the oven until they were nice and crispy. I can’t tell you how many fights were had over that bowl of potatoes. Everyone seemed to pick through to get to the super crunchy, slightly burnt ones. More than a few hands were slapped in the name of finding the best potatoes.

My grandma's legendary Sunday roasted potatoes | browneyedbaker.com #recipe

Those potatoes were one of the things that everyone missed the most once my grandma couldn’t cook anymore and eventually passed away. Since then, my sister has resurrected them and she does the best job of replicating them. Hers look just like my grandma’s – irregular shaped and all. She has made them on Christmas Eve for everyone to munch on while we wait for dinner to be ready, and for some random family dinners as well.

I was well past due to work on perfecting my grandma’s potatoes, and a couple of weeks ago I found myself craving them, so I got to work. My sister said that my grandma used gold potatoes and that they work the best, so I started there and used olive oil and the seasonings my grandma added, put it all under high heat and hoped for the best.

My grandma's legendary Sunday roasted potatoes | browneyedbaker.com #recipe

I don’t think mine looked like hers (I have an aversion to holding and cutting in the air since my knife incident last summer), but oh boy, did they taste like hers! The baking time could vary depending on how thick or thin your pieces are and if your oven runs hot or cold. As you can see, my pieces are no uniform, so I just check them periodically until they get nice and crisp on the bottom and are golden on top.

I absolutely love recreating my grandma’s recipes, but I really do wish she were still here to make them. I’m sure she’s happy that her food traditions are still alive and well :)

My grandma's legendary Sunday roasted potatoes | browneyedbaker.com #recipe

One year ago: Better Than “Anything” Cake
Two years ago: Fresh Fruit Tart with Pastry Cream
Three years ago: Creamy Cucumber Salad
Four years ago: First Birthday Party Smash Cake
Six years ago: French Chocolate Brownies

Grandma's Roasted Potatoes

Yield: 4 to 6 servings

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 40 to 50 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

My grandma's famous roasted potatoes, which she served every single Sunday for decades!

Ingredients:

2 pounds Yukon gold potatoes, peeled and sliced into wedges
4 tablespoons olive oil
Salt and pepper
Italian seasoning

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

2 Place the cut potatoes on a rimmed baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, pepper and Italian seasoning. Using your hands, mix everything together, ensuring that all of the potatoes are coated with oil and seasoning.

3. Bake until the potatoes are golden brown on the bottom and starting to brown on the top, turning occasionally, 40 to 50 minutes. Remove from the oven and serve immediately.

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36 Responses to “Grandma’s Roasted Potatoes”

  1. Marla on June 3, 2014 at 12:29 am

    My mouth is watering! Do you peel the potatoes? They look peeled but I want to make sure because I am definitely making these.

    Reply

    • Michelle on June 3rd, 2014 at 2:27 pm

      Hi Marla, Yes, they are peeled. I edited the recipe above to reflect that.

      Reply

  2. Reshana on June 3, 2014 at 4:50 am

    Looking great, your grandma would be so proud indeed :)

    Reply

  3. paola on June 3, 2014 at 5:32 am

    che buone,complimenti

    Reply

  4. Webbyrå on June 3, 2014 at 5:35 am

    This looks delicious!!! I’ll definitely make this recipe some time next week. :D

    Reply

  5. Diana on June 3, 2014 at 6:36 am

    These really look yummy – def gonna try this! Thanks for sharing!

    Reply

  6. Betsy | JavaCupcake.com on June 3, 2014 at 6:37 am

    I love potatoes…. and these look amazing! I think the crispy edges would be my favorite part! YUM!

    Reply

  7. Shaar on June 3, 2014 at 6:39 am

    Yum, so tantalising. I would also like to confirm that the potatoes have been peeled, then been rinsed & drained/dried please?
    I love your posts and recipes.

    Reply

    • Michelle on June 3rd, 2014 at 2:28 pm

      Hi Shaar, Yes, they are peeled, but not rinsed/drained, just peeled and then cut.

      Reply

  8. Renee Hedden on June 3, 2014 at 7:04 am

    Delicious! My grandfather made the same thing.(He cooked after my grandma passed away.) Must be an Italian thing!

    Reply

  9. Ellen on June 3, 2014 at 9:01 am

    My grandma did these with meat–rib roast mostly ( and rarely!). The potatoes cooked in the meat fat and were fabulous. I’ve never been able to replicate those. Now, roasted potatoes are different–we make them all the time, but often use small or fingerlings and just cut in half or quarters. Roll in a little olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic powder, oregano and/or thyme. They get nice and brown if you put cut side down flat on baking sheet. Bake at 400 for 20-30 min depending on how many you’ve got.
    Thanks for the memories–I wish my kids could have experienced dinners at Grandma’s.

    Reply

  10. Terri on June 3, 2014 at 9:05 am

    Usually simple is the best. These look so yummy. Thanks for the recipe.

    Reply

  11. marcie on June 3, 2014 at 10:07 am

    These potatoes are perfectly golden brown and crispy — perfect for a special Sunday dinner. :)

    Reply

    • Deborah on June 5th, 2014 at 2:53 pm

      Made these yesterday as a side to lamb chops. They were fabulous! I used the Yukon gold potatoes and cooked them on convection at 425 degrees for 30 minutes. The only thing I’d do differently is cook them on parchment paper. It would be easier clean up. I’ll definitely be making these again.

      Reply

  12. Abbe@This is How I Cook on June 3, 2014 at 10:40 am

    Nothing says loving more than Grandma’s potatoes. If I had been at that table i am not sure anyone would have been able to get their fork near them! These look fabulous!

    Reply

  13. Tracy on June 3, 2014 at 11:06 am

    What do you mean by Italian seasoning? Does a company make seasoning called that? Have not seen…

    Reply

    • Michelle on June 3rd, 2014 at 9:03 pm

      Hi Tracy, Yes, it’s pretty common in most grocery stores – where the dried seasoning and herbs, there is a mix called “Italian seasoning”. It’s usually a combination of things herbs like basil, marjoram, thyme, rosemary, oregano and sage.

      Reply

  14. Kathleen on June 3, 2014 at 11:21 am

    My family has always loved it when I add potatoes and carrots to the roasting pan when making roast beef. These sound wonderful and really easy. They are one the menu for next Sunday’s dinner.

    Reply

  15. Melissa McKay on June 3, 2014 at 11:21 am

    I love what you wrote about remembering your Grandma with her food. There is nothing better, in my mind, than remembering my loved ones through wonderful food. It is like having them with you when you enjoy their food!

    Reply

  16. Emily on June 3, 2014 at 12:10 pm

    I make these using sweet potatoes, too. I used to use Mediterranean Sea Salt but can’t find it anymore. Will have to try with Italian seasoning along with the salt and pepper. Love that you replicate your grandma’s recipes! :D

    Reply

  17. Robin Christensen on June 3, 2014 at 12:23 pm

    I’ve been roasting veggies lately, but not JUST potatoes. These look delish! Can’t wait to make them!

    Reply

  18. sarah on June 3, 2014 at 2:16 pm

    My mom makes the same potatoes, except she uses minced onions in there and sautes them in olive oil on the stove instead. She even cuts them the same exact way your grandma does! She is in her mid sixties now and has trouble doing it with her arthritis, but they are some of the best potatoes I have ever eaten!

    Reply

  19. Dan on June 3, 2014 at 2:37 pm

    These look great! needless to say healthy :)

    Reply

  20. Kim D on June 3, 2014 at 2:45 pm

    These look amazing!!! The recipe says to cut the potatoes into wedges, however in the picture they look like slices…which way did you cut them?

    Reply

    • Michelle on June 3rd, 2014 at 9:03 pm

      Hi Kim, I didn’t slice them. As I mentioned, my grandma just haphazardly cut pieces off of a whole potato, so that’s what I did. Some are more chunks, some wedges, and some look more like slices.

      Reply

      • Kim D on June 4th, 2014 at 1:49 pm

        Thanks Michelle. I’m going to give them a try this weekend.

        Reply

  21. Heather @ My Overflowing Cup on June 3, 2014 at 6:24 pm

    These look delicious! As always, your photos are just beautiful. I make potatoes like these often, except that I use rosemary & garlic. I’m going to try Italian Seasoning next time to see which I like better. Thanks for the idea. Sometimes something as simple as changing the spice makes it seem like a brand new dish. :)

    Reply

  22. Martha in KS on June 3, 2014 at 6:25 pm

    Those spuds look yummy! My favorite aunt used to make the hash brown potato casserole – the one with sour cream & chicken soup – we call them Nana’s potatoes eventhough she’s long gone. :-(

    Reply

  23. Samina | The Cupcake Confession on June 4, 2014 at 12:31 am

    Grandmas’ recipes are always the BEST ones…traditional and comfort food at its best! These potatoes look soooo delicious! I can completely see now why it would have been so difficult to keep your hands off these roasted beauties! These look absolutely irresistible!

    Reply

  24. Monisha on June 4, 2014 at 3:27 am

    Looks Yummy BEB.. gonna try these out today for sure.. :)

    Reply

  25. JB on June 4, 2014 at 2:02 pm

    I understand that the potatoes are cut a little haphazardly, but can you tell me about how thick the slices/wedges are? Thickness makes such a difference in determining done-ness and how long it takes. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Michelle on June 5th, 2014 at 9:28 am

      Hi JB, I understand, and I’m sorry I don’t have a better answer for you. These were truly meant to mimic my grandma’s, and that’s what they were – some small, some large, some thinner, some thicker. That’s why we would dig for crispy bits in the bowl; some were crispy, some not so much. All part of the charm of the recipe.

      Reply

  26. Peggy on June 8, 2014 at 11:53 am

    I made these potatoes for a special anniversary dinner for my sister and brother-in-law. They were a huge hit!! I thought my husband was going to lick the bowl, lol.

    Reply

  27. Laura Dembowski on June 8, 2014 at 9:40 pm

    These sound so easy to make, yet so flavorful. I can never hold something and slice it. My mom does that all the time but it freaks me out. How have you healed from your injury? I remember you talking about surgery.

    Reply

    • Michelle on June 10th, 2014 at 9:54 am

      Hi Laura, Thanks for asking! Yes, after one doctor wanted to schedule a surgery in like 2 days (literally), I got a second opinion and that doctor recommended physical therapy. I did it for 8 weeks and the tendon completely healed. I now have full range of motion and did not need surgery. Yay!

      Reply

  28. S. Wilson on June 23, 2014 at 7:54 pm

    My girlfriend and I really enjoyed following this recipe and creating this quite savory side dish. We paired them with lemon pepper swai and spinach. One comment we do have: two pounds of potatoes was just enough between us. If you are making this dish for several people, definitely use more. Cheers!

    Reply

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