The Best Meat Sauce. EVER.

The BEST Meat Sauce. EVER. | browneyedbaker.com #recipe

My grandma always wanted to please everyone, even if it meant creating much more work for herself. Case in point: Sunday dinner. She often made different versions of the same dish in order to appease everyone’s (sometimes picky) taste preferences. Sauce was always a point of contention. For the most part, my grandma made a simple marinara sauce that she flavored with spare ribs as it simmered away. A cousin of mine didn’t like chunks of anything in her sauce, so my grandma never served up true bolognese. I always loved her sauce just the same, even though I have a huge soft spot for a super chunky meat sauce.

Fast forward to my courtship with my Chief Culinary Consultant. At some point in those early months, I had the chance to taste his dad’s meat sauce after it had spent a Sunday afternoon simmering away on the stove. Not only had I fallen head over heels for my now-husband, but I also fell madly in love with that sauce. I’ve been enjoying it for years, and I just made it myself for the first time shortly before Christmas, and made it again a few weeks ago. My CCC walked into the kitchen as I was just getting it to a simmer and said that it smelled like his parents’ house on Sunday.

Success.

I asked my father-in-law if I could share the recipe here with all of you, and he graciously said yes.

The BEST Meat Sauce. EVER. | browneyedbaker.com #recipe

The sauce starts out with a mixture of ground beef, ground pork and ground veal, which is sometimes labeled “meatloaf mix”; it’s browned along with onions and garlic, and basil is thrown in for flavor. A good dose of red wine is stirred in to give the sauce some body and a little oomph. Then comes the tomatoes – two large cans of crushed tomatoes, along with a large can of tomato puree.

Now, let’s talk tomatoes. My father-in-law swears by a specific brand of crushed tomatoes and tomato puree – Tuttorosso. He said he loves it because both the crushed tomatoes and tomato puree are nice and thick, which makes for a heartier sauce. This brand is primarily sold in the Eastern part of the U.S. (and it’s not always available at my own grocery store), so if you can’t find it, feel free to use your favorite or whatever is available. He did note that he has found some brands of crushed tomatoes are a little watery compared to the Tuttorosso brand, so if this happens to be the case, you might want to add a small can of tomato paste to thicken up the sauce.

If you prefer a meatless sauce, you can simply omit the meat and make the sauce as directed below. I actually did that in December when I made baked ziti for Christmas Eve, and it’s just as fabulous.

The BEST Meat Sauce. EVER. | browneyedbaker.com #recipe

I urge you to run, not walk, into the kitchen and get a pot of this started.

Tomorrow, we’re going to talk homemade pasta, and then we’re going to add some cheese and throw it all together into a masterpiece on Wednesday. Get your napkin ready!

One year ago: Gooey Butter Cake
Two years ago: Chicken Tortilla Soup and Bourbon Bread Pudding
Three years ago: Anisette Biscotti and Peanut Butter Cup Crunch Brownie Bars
Four years ago: Secret Ingredient Brownies
Seven years ago: Homemade Soft Pretzels

The Best Meat Sauce. EVER.

Yield: About 3½ quarts of sauce

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 3 hours

Total Time: 3 hours 15 minutes

My father-in-law's legendary meat sauce recipe

Ingredients:

½ cup olive oil
8 ounces ground beef
8 ounces ground pork
8 ounces ground veal
1 large yellow onion, finely chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
4 tablespoons dried basil
Salt and pepper, to taste
½ cup red wine
2 (28-ounce) cans crushed tomatoes
1 (28-ounce) can tomato puree

Directions:

1. Heat the olive oil in a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. When it is shimmering, add the ground beef, pork and veal, and cook, breaking it up with a wooden spoon, until the meat is browned.

2. Add the onion and garlic to the meat mixture and sauté, stirring occasionally, until the onions are translucent, about 7 to 10 minutes. Stir in the dried basil and season with salt and pepper.

3. Stir in the red wine and let simmer for about 1 minute, until mostly evaporated.

4. Reduce the heat to low and add the crushed tomatoes and tomato puree to the pot, stirring to incorporate. Reduce the heat to the lowest simmer possible, and place a lid on the pot slightly ajar. Simmer for 2 to 3 hours, stirring occasionally.

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85 Responses to “The Best Meat Sauce. EVER.”

  1. Marla on February 17, 2014 at 12:11 am

    This looks amazing. I do have a question…..I always drain the grease after browning my meat. Do you do this? If not, is it greasy?
    I can’t wait to try it. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 17th, 2014 at 8:32 am

      Hi Marla, I do not drain the meat. I don’t find it to be too greasy, but you could definitely drain it if you prefer to remove all of the grease.

      Reply

  2. The Macadame on February 17, 2014 at 3:00 am

    This looks divine!
    I’ve been craving pasta for days and this has just about sent me over the edge!
    Thanks!
    The Macadame. xx
    http://www.creamstop.com

    Reply

  3. Betsy on February 17, 2014 at 5:52 am

    Can’t wait to try it!

    Reply

  4. Carl Giardina on February 17, 2014 at 6:22 am

    This is a great traditional meat sauce recipe that I and untold thousands of Italians have used for years. It’s best meat sauce recipe in existence .Thanks for bringing it to everyone’s attention .If they try it they will love it !

    Reply

  5. Laura @ Lauras Baking Talent on February 17, 2014 at 6:25 am

    Looks Delicious! I think you definitely found the right family for your in-laws :)

    Reply

  6. Stacy | Wicked Good Kitchen on February 17, 2014 at 6:26 am

    Love this recipe, Michelle! Thanks for sharing. :) Pinning!

    Reply

  7. Jenna on February 17, 2014 at 6:50 am

    I’ll be running to the kitchen after I buy the ingredients! thanks to you and your father-in-law for this great recipe :)

    Reply

  8. Taylee @ twist me fit on February 17, 2014 at 7:30 am

    Thanks for sharing, looks amazing!

    Reply

  9. Miranda Walton on February 17, 2014 at 7:35 am

    I use this same combination of meat (ground beef, ground pork and ground veal) for my meatloaf and it is the best! I will have try it for my meat sauce as well. Thanks for the idea!

    Reply

  10. lori on February 17, 2014 at 7:47 am

    Michelle,
    Thanks for posting this family recipe. It looks terrific. I use the same brand of tomato products. If you are lucky to be in the New York/New Jersey area after the first of the year, Shop Rite our local supermarket has a can-can sale which usually features this brand at really good prices.

    Reply

  11. Aron on February 17, 2014 at 7:54 am

    This looks soooo tasty. I cannot wait to give this one a try! Thank you for sharing as always!

    Reply

  12. Karen on February 17, 2014 at 8:05 am

    Your father-in-law is “right on” stating he prefers Tuttorosso crushed tomatoes. They are thick, have a delicious taste, and America’s Test Kitchen likes them, too. Another plus, is they are cheaper (at least here in Northern Ohio) than other brands. My husband uses them to make his homemade tomato soup (Ina recipe), but I will definitely use them when making this pasta sauce.

    Reply

  13. Beth (It's Always Someone's Birthday on February 17, 2014 at 8:31 am

    This looks AMAZING! I’m not a big fan of pasta, but I will definitely be trying this one!

    Reply

  14. Melanie on February 17, 2014 at 8:40 am

    Ahh, I just made sauce last night! Does his family call it gravy, too? We like Tuttorosso or Contadina in a pinch. Ours is very similar to yours procedurally except that instead of having loose ground meat, we sear off porkchops, beef for braccioli, and pre-baked meatballs to give the sauce its meaty flavor, and we’ve never put onion in it except when we’re doing marinara. Where in Italy is his family from?

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 17th, 2014 at 11:11 pm

      Hi Melanie, Definitely do not call it gravy (my family doesn’t either). His family is from Bagheria, Sicily.

      Reply

  15. Fiona @ Get Fit Fiona on February 17, 2014 at 8:46 am

    Isn’t it fynny how the smell of certain foods stays with you long after you’ve last had it? I remember my grandma also making spaghetti sauce that was oh so delicious. 15 years later my dad found a recipe that smelled and tasted just like hers did.

    Reply

  16. Liz @ Tip Top Shape on February 17, 2014 at 8:59 am

    I’ve never made my own sauce before, but this looks fantastic!!

    Reply

  17. Brandy Yekel on February 17, 2014 at 10:03 am

    I am not one to typically cook with any wine. What do you recommend for this recipe?

    Thanks,
    Brandy

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 17th, 2014 at 11:11 pm

      Hi Brandy, I use whatever red wine I already have open. For this pot, I used a cabernet sauvignon.

      Reply

  18. Emily on February 17, 2014 at 11:04 am

    This looks so good! A lot simpler than the one I usually make — I tend to throw in a lot more spices. Can’t wait to give this a try!

    Reply

  19. Katie on February 17, 2014 at 11:05 am

    Do you have the recipe for the chunky meat sauce with short ribs that you talked about? That sounds like my husband’s version of heaven!

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 17th, 2014 at 11:14 pm

      Hi Katie, It wasn’t actually a meat sauce. My grandma would just simmer spare ribs in her “plain” sauce, and then take them out before she served the sauce.

      Reply

  20. Jen of My Tiny Oven on February 17, 2014 at 11:07 am

    I had no idea what to make for dinner tonite, but now I do… That sauce looks AMAZING!! Can’t wait to try it.

    Reply

  21. Linda hart on February 17, 2014 at 11:17 am

    Quick search found Tuttorosso crushed tomatoes on Amazon. Might be the only option for those of us on the West Coast…..or a road trip?

    Reply

  22. Michael R. on February 17, 2014 at 11:18 am

    Don’t have Tuttorosso brand here in Utah. It needs to be said however, that using brand-name tomato products DEFINITELY makes a difference – you get what you pay for! Thanks, Michelle :)

    Reply

  23. Kathy on February 17, 2014 at 11:21 am

    I was born and raised in Pittsburgh, and this is the sauce recipe I have made for 60 years. Maybe the Pgh. grandmothers shared this recipe decades ago. I agree with your father-in-law about the brand of tomatoes – they are thicker, sweeter, and often the cheapest brand in the store! I now live down south and “meatloaf” mix is not something they know about here. If I can’t find ground veal I just go with the beef and pork, and it’s still wonderful.

    Reply

  24. Vicki Pieranunzi on February 17, 2014 at 11:55 am

    Definitely going to try this making meatballs with the meatloaf mix due to that picky cousin of yours. Where locally does he buy that brand of tomatoes?

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 17th, 2014 at 11:15 pm

      Haha! He said he has found them at Giant Eagle in New Ken and Community Market, but that he hasn’t seen the tomato puree in awhile.

      Reply

  25. Kathy on February 17, 2014 at 12:59 pm

    So I notice there is no oregano, nor anything sweet to take the edge off the tomato flavor. If making traditional spaghetti would you add any other spices?

    Reply

    • kathy on February 17th, 2014 at 1:18 pm

      Forgot to ask about the wine. Whenever a recipe calls for wine, I throw in whatever we have on hand. The problem is we don’t drink much so when we do we splurge on expensive wine. When I add expensive wine to a sauce, it has two effects: First, my husband has a conniption ;) … and Second, the sauce is often overwhelmed by the wine (I see this mainly with red wine).

      Even though many recipes call for red wine, they are not specific, even though it can cause wide variances in the taste. It can be really frustrating. Michelle, can you please help us out by giving us a wine in cooking primer? I’m sure i am not the only one with this problem. :)
      Thank you!
      Kathy from Minneapolis

      Reply

      • Michelle on February 17th, 2014 at 11:18 pm

        Hi Kathy, I used cabernet sauvignon since we had an open bottle. I think that’s a good all-purpose red wine to keep on hand for cooking.

        Reply

        • Libby Miller on March 4th, 2014 at 1:45 pm

          the only red wine I have is a sweet red // will that work???

          Reply

          • Michelle on March 4th, 2014 at 4:55 pm

            Hi Libby, I have not used a sweet wine, so I can’t say for sure how it would affect the flavor, but I tend to think it should be okay.

            Reply

      • Nichole on February 23rd, 2014 at 7:34 am

        They have small 4 packs of wine (6-8 oz. per bottle) now that are perfect for cooking. You can get white and red and keep on hand without it going bad. Make sure you pick the real wine not wine coolers in the refrigerator section.

        Reply

    • Michelle on February 17th, 2014 at 11:16 pm

      Hi Kathy, Nope, I wouldn’t change a thing! (I’ve actually never added oregano to sauce.)

      Reply

  26. Denise on February 17, 2014 at 1:07 pm

    I can’t wait to try this recipe! I bought rigatoni the other day because I hadn’t had it for awhile, and that is what I’m going to cook for this sauce! What kind of red wine should I buy? I know people always say to cook with what you’d drink, but I don’t know what that would be. Thanks!

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 17th, 2014 at 11:17 pm

      Hi Denise, I used cabernet sauvignon since I had an open bottle. I think that’s a pretty good red wine to keep on hand for cooking.

      Reply

      • Cynthia on February 20th, 2014 at 2:56 am

        Oak-aged Barbera would also go nicely with a tomato meat sauce.

        Reply

  27. Denise on February 17, 2014 at 3:21 pm

    Your father-in-law and my mother must have had the same cooking teacher! This is exactly what I grew up with (in Pittsburgh, the best hometown ever, by the way) and have passed on to my own daughter. “Are we having red sauce tonight?” was the dinner question of our house, often with her friends at the door or on the other end of the phone waiting for the answer! Thank you for sharing this and for the warm, breezy, inviting way of your blog. It’s a favorite of mine, Pittsburgh prejudice aside!

    Reply

  28. Alexe @ Keys to the Cucina on February 17, 2014 at 4:43 pm

    I love a good red sauce recipe, and happy to hear your Grandma used to use spare ribs too, that gives it great flavor!

    Reply

  29. Marcia s. on February 17, 2014 at 4:46 pm

    I can’t wait to make this sauce! My favorite brand of tomato puree is Tuttorosso. I can only find it in one of our Chicagoland area stores, and always stock up when I do. It was at the top of America’s Test Kitchen’s taste testing on one of their episodes a few years ago.

    Reply

  30. Robin Christensen on February 17, 2014 at 4:51 pm

    Please tell your father-in-law THANK YOU!!!

    Reply

  31. Chrissy on February 17, 2014 at 10:26 pm

    Our family sauce has meatballs, Italian sausage, pork ribs and chicken thighs simmering for hours to infuse flavors. I bet it’ll be even better with red wine!

    Reply

  32. Emjay on February 18, 2014 at 12:49 am

    Sounds very similar to the one I make but I use more spices and add sugar.
    I will have to try yours. Sounds good.

    Reply

  33. Fructe uscate on February 18, 2014 at 7:45 am

    This looks perfect!

    Reply

  34. Angie W. on February 18, 2014 at 11:03 am

    I’m wondering about making this sauce sans meat and canning it. Does anyone have any experience with canning pasta sauce? I’d love to be able to make a double or triple recipe on a weekend I have time and then have it on hand to just grab a jar without using one of those ‘swear words’ kinds of sauce. :-)

    Reply

  35. Kathy on February 18, 2014 at 11:10 am

    The only crushed tuttorosso tomatoes I can find are already seasoned with basil. Would these be okay to use? Thank you.

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 20th, 2014 at 1:16 pm

      Hi Kathy, Sure you can use that, you may just want to cut the basil in the recipe by half.

      Reply

  36. Darlene on February 18, 2014 at 12:18 pm

    I can never find veal. is it ok with just pork and beef?

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 20th, 2014 at 1:17 pm

      Hi Darlene, Absolutely! Also, you may want to check the meat department for pre-mixed packages of “meatloaf mix” – this is what is typically available in my grocery store.

      Reply

      • Nancy Long on February 26th, 2014 at 1:46 pm

        I live in St. Pete, FL now and their idea of meatloaf mix is beef and pork. Can’t find ground veal at all and not much of any kind of veal really. wonder about subbing ground turkey.

        Reply

  37. Jaime on February 18, 2014 at 12:50 pm

    This recipe is almost identical to the one my mom passed down to me (minus the veal). The “secret” to our sauce is the addition of 3 slices of diced bacon during the meat browning portion of the recipe…sooooo good!

    Reply

  38. Honest Mum on February 18, 2014 at 1:05 pm

    This looks incredible! I would love you to link up to #tastytuesdays if you fancied it: http://honestmum.com/papa-gs-prawns-with-feta/

    Reply

  39. Daphne on February 18, 2014 at 2:04 pm

    Thank you Michelle and others especially that diced bacon. I was telling my husband about this sauce last night. Going to give in a try in a few weeks. Not sure if anyone asked, Does it freeze well if made in advance of family visits?

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 20th, 2014 at 1:18 pm

      Hi Daphne, Yes! We freeze this all the time. Just let it cool completely and then transfer to freezer-safe containers. I’ve found that if you use containers that you can fill just about to the top, that keeps ice from forming on top of the sauce. You don’t want too much space for air.

      Reply

  40. Gwyn on February 18, 2014 at 5:48 pm

    This looks really yummy!! I am anxious to try it. But like Daphne, I am wondering if I can freeze this. I am just a nice single person!!!

    Reply

    • Michelle on February 20th, 2014 at 1:23 pm

      Hi Gwyn, Yes, you can definitely freeze this!

      Reply

  41. Jennifer on February 18, 2014 at 11:14 pm

    I have been looking for a really good meat sauce, so I have to try this! I have a spaghetti squash in the fridge waiting for it ;)

    xo Jennifer

    http://seekingstyleblog.wordpress.com

    Reply

  42. Nicole on February 19, 2014 at 3:04 am

    Yum…I just made ravioli last week stuffed with my meatballs and ricotta. I used my version of a bolognese. Meat sauces are so versatile. Just some tips I’ve found: I always add in some heavy cream to smooth it out towards the end. If I have leftover ham, I will throw in the bone since it adds depth to the sauce but this isn’t necessary (I’m going to have to try the spare ribs now). Using different types of meats like pork or veal or ground Italian sausage add depth that ground beef by itself doesn’t have. Wine can be dry or not – these sauces can handle some sweetness (I’ve seen people add a little honey or sugar even), but just no cooking wine. Depending on what you are using it for, you can easily switch things. For example, when I make meatball subs, I make a pepperonata in the pan first by frying bell peppers, onions, and garlic and then following the rest of the recipe. It’s super easy and more flavorful if you make this in one big pot while not draining anything. Roasting your own tomatoes with spices like thyme and bay leaves is yummy too (just keep the juices from the pan you roast them in). For those wanting a spice blend, I enjoy 2-1-1 ratio of fresh basil, oregano, and parsley. I add a little crushed fennel too and sometimes red pepper flakes if I want some heat. For those with children, these sauces are perfect for hiding veggies. Start out with a mirepoix: grating carrots, dicing onions, and dicing celery (optional) to the pan and then follow the recipe. I even add in grated zucchini and finish off with some spinach when I want to hide extra veggies. The kids don’t notice but they are getting a lot of healthy things mixed in.

    Sorry for the novel, but I grew up in a French-Italian family and learned a lot of tricks to making meat sauces. It’s also been my go to since I can easily hide veggies for the kids, can improvise if I don’t have all of the ingredients (though I usually have most on hand), and can alter the recipe for my vegan relatives.

    Reply

  43. Esther on February 19, 2014 at 3:49 pm

    Thanks for sharing a family recipe-looks yummy!
    http://www.thelipstickchannel.com

    Reply

  44. Kayla s on February 19, 2014 at 5:51 pm

    Hi, How is the basil flavor in this is it strong? I’m not a big basil fan I can tolerate it I like it for flavor but I don’t not like it to be so strong I can in point he basil.

    Reply

    • Brandy Yekel on February 19th, 2014 at 7:33 pm

      I made this sauce tonight…. It’s good… But I do think there is a lot of basil. I think you could get away with half. Plus the crushed tomatoes I used – Tuttorosso- were with basil. BTW for the local SWPA folks, I found the Tuttorosso at Giant Eagle, on sale, with a coupon.

      Reply

    • Michelle on February 20th, 2014 at 1:39 pm

      Hi Kayla, If you are not a basil fan, then I would cut back on the basil, probably in half.

      Reply

  45. Lauren on February 19, 2014 at 10:00 pm

    Hi all, can the leftover sauce be frozen? Thank you!

    Reply

    • Cynthia M on February 20th, 2014 at 2:40 am

      Yes, meat sauce can be frozen in a freezer safe container. Leave at least 1/2 inch of space in container, because sauce will expand when frozen. Also, be sure sauce has cooled to room temperature before you put the lid on the container. You can store it in freezer up to 4 months. The night before you plan to use it, move it to the refrigerator to thaw.

      Reply

    • Michelle on February 20th, 2014 at 1:43 pm

      Hi Lauren, Yes, definitely! We freeze it all the time!

      Reply

  46. Patti Z on February 19, 2014 at 10:01 pm

    Now I know what I’m cooking this weekend, thanks to you and your father-in-law!

    Reply

  47. Hunter @ Vivian & Me on February 22, 2014 at 2:09 am

    Um, yum. Family recipes are the best!

    Reply

  48. Julie BG on February 23, 2014 at 2:46 pm

    I found your recipe while surfing my home page on Pinterest and I follow your website as well. I’m excited to taste the final project which is your Lasagna Bolognese. I’ve got a pot of your sauce on right now. Thank you for such great recipes. They’ve never failed me. And thank your father-in-law too!

    Reply

  49. wendyworldly on February 28, 2014 at 8:55 pm

    This sounds delicious and I will definitely be trying it. I live in Oz so no Tuttorusso tomatoes here but definitely agree there is variance between brands…Italian brands are best. Also so happy that some one mentioned Ina’s tomato and basil soup, I have been looking for a recipe for this forever and after checking it out, it sounds perfect. So love your blog and look forward to your emails.

    Reply

  50. Jen on March 1, 2014 at 1:29 pm

    I just made this sauce today!! It’s simmering now as I write this. Can’t wait to try it a bit later. I’m also going to attempt homemade lasagne noodles – thanks for all of the wonderful ideas!

    Reply

  51. Amy G on March 6, 2014 at 12:20 am

    Yum, in a very serious way! I made this for dinner last night. It’s now my go to sauce recipe. Thank you, thank you! So, so good.

    Reply

  52. Alisha on March 27, 2014 at 1:33 pm

    I have been searching for a good tomato sauce recipe, and this one is perfect! It works with or without meat. I like southern red wines which tend to be sweeter, so I used my favorite Carolina red and it really complemented the flavors perfectly. This sauce and the pizza sauce recipe under the Chicago style pizza have become my favorite sauce recipes! They always come out perfectly and when you use higher quality crushed tomatoes, you can definitely tell a difference.

    Reply

  53. Jai on May 19, 2014 at 5:09 am

    Thanks for sharing your recipes! Can the wine be left out? Is there a non-alcoholic substitute when recipes call for wine? Have a wonderful day.

    Reply

    • Michelle on May 19th, 2014 at 2:08 pm

      Hi Jai, You can just omit it.

      Reply

  54. Zoya @ The Chocolate Heart on July 22, 2014 at 9:10 am

    This looks absolutely amazing! My sister is having a dinner with some friends and cousins tomorrow, and left me in charge of lasagna – this is a lifesaver, thanks to you and your father-in-law. One question: can the pork be omitted? My family doesn’t have it, we’re a Muslim family.

    Reply

    • Michelle on July 22nd, 2014 at 9:48 am

      Hi Zoya, You can definitely leave out the pork and just do a beef/veal mix or just do beef. Enjoy!! :)

      Reply

      • Zoya @ The Chocolate Heart on July 22nd, 2014 at 9:52 am

        Thanks so much, but one more thing, about the wine… can it be replaced by another liquid such as chicken stock?

        Reply

        • Michelle on July 22nd, 2014 at 4:10 pm

          Hi Zoya, Yes, although the sauce won’t taste as full-bodied as if you had used the wine.

          Reply

  55. Erin on August 26, 2014 at 10:16 pm

    Made this tonight with all veal – got a deal on it at the store; saw several posters unable to even find veal! All veal gives the velvety flavor of beef without overpowering. Looking forward to freezing and enjoying it later. p.s. saw lots of questions about wine – I used a cheapo pinot noir (one that I enjoy drinking) and it came out great!

    Reply

  56. Debbie vigil on August 30, 2014 at 4:18 pm

    I have made this sauce 3 times now. I was a little skeptical…but let me tell you it is FANTASTIC! my grown up children, grandchildren, friends love the taste texture and the full body this sauce has. My son said well this sauce is the star of this meal. You know how we all think we need to add something to a recipe ok I am guilty I added a piece of pancetta once but truly you need to add only ingredients listed to have perfect sauce.

    Reply

  57. Virginia Rawl on October 16, 2014 at 1:50 pm

    I rarely comment on anything on the interwebs, but I have to rave about this fabulous recipe! This sauce is rich, complex, and delicious. The combination of meats adds a fantastic flavor and hint of sweetness (that veal, am I right?!?). My husband craves this, and I make it at least twice a month! I will say that the quality of wine does make a difference. I use a nice, rich chianti and it turns out delicious every time.

    Reply

  58. CK on November 25, 2014 at 3:10 pm

    How many people does this recipe serve? enough sauce for 5-6?

    Reply

    • Michelle on November 27th, 2014 at 9:59 am

      Hi CK, In terms of pasta, it makes enough for about 3 pounds of pasta, with a little left over.

      Reply

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