Popovers

Popovers Recipe

Back in the fall, my grandma called me one day and asked if I had a recipe for popovers. She and my grandfather had just come back from visiting his brother in Arizona, and his wife made popovers that my grandma said were outstanding. She wanted to replicate them at home, but didn’t have a recipe, nor did she have a popover pan. Popovers have long been on my 100 list, so I thought it was the perfect time to tackle them myself. I bought us both a popover pan and surprised her with the pan and a copy of the recipe. It took me a couple of months with the holiday hustle and bustle, but I finally got around to making the recipe. It couldn’t have been easier or more delicious!

Popovers Recipe

I’d actually never had a popover before and thought that they would be more of a muffin consistency, but they tasted much more like a baked pancake or a hollow soufflĂ©. The recipe suggested serving them fresh from the oven with butter and jam, which is exactly how I ate mine. It was amazing, and definitely better warm than when left to sit at room temperature. You could also serve them dusted with powdered sugar or with maple syrup. They’re a perfect addition to any breakfast or brunch menu, and only take minutes to mix together.

What’s your favorite way to eat a popover?

Popovers Recipe

One year ago: How I Refinished My Grandma’s Old Dough Board
Two years ago: Waldorf Salad
Five years ago: Brioche Raisin Snails

Popovers

Yield: 12 popovers

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

An easy recipe for popovers - they're incredibly light and make a great addition to any brunch menu!

Ingredients:

1½ cups whole milk
6 eggs
1½ cups all-purpose flour
¾ teaspoon salt
4½ teaspoons powdered sugar

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F and position the rack in the lower third of the oven.

2. Generously butter a 12-cup popover tin; set aside.

3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the milk and eggs. Add the flour, salt and powdered sugar and whisk briefly to incorporate the dry ingredients. There may still be small lumps throughout the batter, which is fine; do not overmix.

4. Fill each cup of the popover tin with 5 tablespoons of the batter. Bake until the popovers are very puffed and rise above the top of the tin by 3 inches, about 30 minutes. Immediately turn the popovers out of the pan and serve warm.

Notes:

  • If you're using a dark, non-stick pan, be sure to reduce the oven temperature by 25 degrees (I forgot to do this!).

(Recipe adapted from Martha Stewart's Baking Handbook)

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64 Responses to “Popovers”

  1. Averie @ Averie Cooks on March 18, 2013 at 12:25 am

    Popovers!! love them! Haven’t had one in at least 15 yrs since my dad used to make them for the family when I was growing up! They’re on my bucket list, too. Yours turned out beautifully! I am trying to be el cheapo and not actually buy the popover pan b/c it’s such a clunker to store (have looked at them in stores and the wells are so deep and bulky) but not sure if they’ll work in a muffin pan or not. Did you think the popover pan was instrumental for success?

    Reply

    • Jena on March 18th, 2013 at 9:04 am

      My sister always makes delightful popovers in muffin pans; I think you just have to be careful about the amount of batter. Happy baking!

      Reply

    • Joan on March 18th, 2013 at 10:53 am

      I use custard cups (Pyrex). I have had wonderful popovers that were cooked in little flower pots (the very small clay ones with a bit of foil on the bottom. I think if you are careful about how much batter you use at a time, you can pretty much use any small container.

      Reply

  2. sara on March 18, 2013 at 12:35 am

    YUM. I need some popovers. :)

    Reply

  3. Amanda Abernathy on March 18, 2013 at 1:01 am

    I’ve never had a popover.

    Reply

  4. Kiran @ KiranTarun.com on March 18, 2013 at 2:08 am

    I need popovers in my life! So easy to make and yum!

    Reply

  5. Angela Wicentowich on March 18, 2013 at 2:14 am

    I think popovers and Yorkshire puddings are very similar and we had Yorkshire puddings every Sunday night dinner. My paternal grandmother is British and Sunday dinner consisted of roast beef, mashed potatoes, veggies, Yorkshire puddings and gravy,
    I think the difference between the two is putting drippings into the pan, heating them up and then adding the batter.
    To this day, covering them in gravy is my favourite way to eat them. My father use to eat the leftover ones with his own homemade raspberry jam.
    Thank you for sharing this recipe!

    Reply

    • Sarah D on March 18th, 2013 at 8:27 am

      I’ve seen several popover recipes that call for you to spoon butter or drippings into each cup before you put the batter in. My family also makes it in casserole form as “yorkshire pudding” served with roast beef and used to sop up the drippings. OHH so good.

      Reply

    • Petrichoria on September 28th, 2013 at 8:25 pm

      Yes, here in the UK Yorkshires are made without sugar and usually served with lashings of gravy as part of a roast dinner, but some people still like to keep a few back to eat after dinner with jam or syrup as a dessert. (Similarly, it is a tradition in some parts to reserve some of the dumplings from a stew to smother with golden syrup at the end of the meal.)

      Our grandmothers teach us that the secret to a really high rise is to pour the batter into a very hot tin with a little near-smoking hot fat in the bottom and getting them into the oven pronto.

      Love your site, by the way. Great recipes.

      Reply

  6. Dedra on March 18, 2013 at 3:58 am

    Your photo looks great. We have had them lots but not in the last few years, but now after seeing your photo, Ill be making them real soon.
    I have always just used a Yorkshire pudding recipe and done it in the blender. That recipe uses a round cake pan, but I like the individual ones and use the muffin tins.
    preheat the muffin tin in the oven first with either butter or bacon fat in it. the fat melts, so when pour the batter in the fat goes up the sides to coat.
    We eat them warm with roast, most people but gravy of them, but I just use lots of butter. mmmmmm. now I’m going to dream of them.
    thank you so much for sharing

    Reply

  7. Katrina @ Warm Vanilla Sugar on March 18, 2013 at 6:07 am

    I love the look of these! Such a classic :)

    Reply

  8. Chrissy on March 18, 2013 at 6:36 am

    I grew up with popovers, made in individual Pyrex dishes. I recently made them in a muffin pan (2 actually, every other space) and the recipe I found required the ingredients to be at room temperature. Mine were no where as tall as yours. Did your ingredients start out cold? Beautiful blog!

    Reply

    • Michelle on March 26th, 2013 at 12:02 am

      Hi Chrissy, The recipe didn’t mention anything at room temperature, so I just used eggs and milk straight from the fridge.

      Reply

    • Rachel on April 2nd, 2013 at 10:47 pm

      They don’t get as tall in muffin tins — popover pans are designed to create that tall shape. I don’t have one, though, and always made them in muffin pans and they were pretty darn delicious anyway.

      Reply

  9. Monica on March 18, 2013 at 6:51 am

    I love popovers and yours looks great! I’ve made them once (in a regular muffin tin since I don’t have a popover pan) and this remind me that I need to make them again soon! : )

    Reply

  10. Jennifer @ Peanut Butter and Peppersj on March 18, 2013 at 6:59 am

    Oh my gosh, I haven’t had a popover since I was a kid. If memory serves me correctly my Mom would make popovers in an angle food cake pan. All I remember is it was the size of cake and it was so good. She only made them once or twice a year! Your recipe looks so amazing!!

    Reply

  11. Marie @ Little Kitchie on March 18, 2013 at 7:15 am

    Popovers are one of my favorite things to make! Yours look so gorgeous!!!

    Reply

  12. Heather @ Sugar Dish Me on March 18, 2013 at 7:31 am

    Popovers are on my list, too. Eating them warm smothered in strawberry butter with my dad when I was really little is one of my favorite memories ever. I’ll be making this for sure! How do you like the pan you bought?

    Reply

    • Michelle on March 26th, 2013 at 12:02 am

      Hi Heather, It seemed to work out really well! No complaints!

      Reply

  13. Cheryl E. on March 18, 2013 at 7:38 am

    Popovers are just like Yorkshire Pudding. I make them in the same popover pan. That is the key to their height. Since they are hollow, they are the perfect vessel for pouring in lots of gravy with your roast beef!

    Reply

  14. Courtney G. on March 18, 2013 at 8:41 am

    My favorite way to eat a popover is with butter and jam at The Jordan Pond House at Acadia National Park. Yum!!

    Reply

    • JoAnn Cawood on June 23rd, 2013 at 9:39 pm

      That is correct, you cannot beat the Jordan Pond House for popovers. I make mine from a smaller version of their recipe. Everyone loves them!

      Reply

  15. nancy K on March 18, 2013 at 8:41 am

    I adore popovers…they are one of my favorite treats to have for a Sunday breakfast. I also was introduced to a large pizza like version called a Pannekoeken.The same basics are used but it is made in a large, round, rimmed pan and is topped with any combination of ingredients.

    Reply

  16. Nicole Shugars on March 18, 2013 at 8:43 am

    We love to eat ours with soup. Yum.

    Reply

  17. Tracey on March 18, 2013 at 8:53 am

    Popovers have been on my to-do list for way longer than I’d care to admit. I don’t have a pan either but I really need to get on it because these look amazing!

    Reply

  18. Amy's Cooking Adventures on March 18, 2013 at 9:36 am

    Yummy! This is one of my bucket list recipes! Now I just have to do it!

    Reply

  19. Valerie C on March 18, 2013 at 9:58 am

    When I was in high school, my best friend’s mom used to make popovers all the time. Her parents were originally from Holland/The Netherlands so food was always something to be explored when I was spending time there. How they ate their popovers, a TO-DIE-FOR way, was to break a hot one open and put butter and hagelslag (chocolate jimmies/sprinkles). I promise you, it is DELISH! After 20 some years…I can still taste and smell the scrumptious combination! Try it!

    Reply

  20. Candace Karu on March 18, 2013 at 10:02 am

    I’ve been looking at popover recipes recently…this looks like a winner. Can’t wait to try it with my homemade blueberry jam!

    Reply

  21. Sue on March 18, 2013 at 10:10 am

    I love popovers, hot out of the oven with just butter on them. I’ll have to try this recipe which uses more eggs than other recipes I’ve tried. I have a popover pan, but they always stick in it, so I just use a non-stick large muffin tin, which seems to work well. Thanks for this recipe.

    Reply

  22. Marcie @ Flavor The Moments on March 18, 2013 at 10:28 am

    I’ve always wanted to make popovers! Yours look incredibly good. I’m glad to hear a popover pan isn’t completely necessary. I hate having special pans for so many things!

    Reply

  23. Kathy on March 18, 2013 at 10:52 am

    Popovers are on my list too! I don’t have a popover pan so I might try it in a muffin pan. I made Yorkshire pudding for Christmas Eve which was incredible and so easy! I can’t wait to try these!

    Reply

  24. Annamaria @ Bakewell Junction on March 18, 2013 at 10:55 am

    Michelle,
    I’ve.ever had popovers either. Yours look perfect.
    Annamaria

    Reply

  25. Cookbook Queen on March 18, 2013 at 11:12 am

    I’ve never ever made popovers but they look so so fun!! And yummy. Definitely need to try these for Easter!!

    Reply

  26. Louise on March 18, 2013 at 11:13 am

    A good use for yorkshire pudding is to make toad-in-the-hole. Sausages baked in the batter. This is going to be my dinner today.

    Reply

  27. Annie @ Annie's City Kitchen on March 18, 2013 at 11:20 am

    I’ve actually never had a popover before either and I’m surprised how way they sound! I guess I never really knew what made the popover “pop” actually. You’ve made me want a popover pan now!

    Reply

  28. natalie@thesweetslife on March 18, 2013 at 11:34 am

    I absolutely love popovers! We used to always eat them on Thanksgiving but I’m making them more often now because I can’t get enough of them :)

    Reply

  29. teresa on March 18, 2013 at 11:36 am

    It’s like you read my mind!! First with the Baileys, and now the popovers! I had never even heard of popovers until recently, and I have been wanting to try them ever since. They look really good. I don’t have a popover pan , but i will improvise something.

    Reply

  30. Gloria @ Simply Gloria on March 18, 2013 at 11:41 am

    I just put a popover pan in my cart from Amazon! Thank you for the great recipe for when my new pan arrives! (=

    Reply

  31. Holiday Baker Man on March 18, 2013 at 12:12 pm

    I make our yorkshire pudding recipe in a popover pan. Delish! Great to see them in a sweeter mode!

    Reply

  32. Deon on March 18, 2013 at 1:47 pm

    Okay. We have tried and tried to do popovers and have yet to master them. This recipe looks like a winner, so I’m going to give this one a try! Thanks!

    Reply

  33. Gigi on March 18, 2013 at 2:12 pm

    I have an oven-baked pancake recipe that I think could be used for popovers as there is little difference in the recipes. I may have to try it! Thanks!

    Reply

  34. Molly_Bakelette on March 18, 2013 at 2:28 pm

    Mind if I popover for a popover? Haha…sorry I have a very pathetic sense of humor! I love mine with jam! Love all the layers in yours! xo

    Reply

  35. Jess on March 18, 2013 at 2:59 pm

    I’ve NEVER had a popover, but have always wanted to try it! :)

    I would LOVE for you to join my Link Up!

    http://www.pluckys-secondthought.com/pluckys-link-up-3/

    Reply

  36. Ashley @ Wishes and Dishes on March 18, 2013 at 3:46 pm

    I’ve never had popovers before! Can you use muffin tins for these?

    Reply

    • Michelle on March 26th, 2013 at 12:04 am

      Hi Ashley, I’ve seen some folks in this comment thread mention that they have, but you need to be careful of how much batter you use. Enjoy!

      Reply

  37. Suzanne D. on March 18, 2013 at 5:14 pm

    Love popovers! My families favorites are: jam & butter, pate & cheeses, nutella, and lemon juice & pwd sugar. Yum.

    Reply

  38. Susan on March 18, 2013 at 8:11 pm

    Popovers are just like Yorkshire Pudding, except there is no sugar in them and the tins are greased with beef fat-usually from a beef roast. I make them in muffin tins, and we eat them with good homeade beef gravy! I’ve never had them on the sweetened side, but they are on my list now! I saw a show that made them with grated grueyere cheese and lots of cracked black pepper! I bet they’re great savory OR sweet!

    Reply

  39. Rachel on March 18, 2013 at 8:44 pm

    Yummy! I’ve never actually had one but they look and sound delish!

    Quick question for you, I’m making a cake for Easter that suggests starting with a french vanilla cake base. How is that different from a regular vanilla cake?

    Reply

  40. Alyson on March 19, 2013 at 12:31 am

    My recipe has only 3 eggs but adds 1 tab. melted butter to the batter. ( makes 10 popovers in a muffin pan) I have found the trick is to make sure the ingredients are slightly warm and to spray the pan and put a dab of bacon drippings in each cup, heat the pan until smoking (3-4 min). Another variation that is great is to add 1/2 tea. colmans dry mustard to the batter and a couple small cubes Gruyere in each cup. Top with additional finely grated (I use the microplane) Gruyere as soon as they come out of the oven (saw this on Diner’s Drive-ins and Dives and they looked terrific!)

    Reply

  41. Kathy@sugarrushbaking on March 19, 2013 at 3:25 pm

    Oh Yay! So glad you posted this recipe. My daughter gave me a popover pan for Christmas and I have not tried it yet. I will definitely this recipe. When we lived in California we used to go to this place called Lord Charley’s and have prime rib and they would always have yorkshire pudding on the side. They also served it with roast beef.

    Reply

  42. Tina on March 19, 2013 at 5:01 pm

    Just made these today! It was my first time so I halved the recipe and I didn’t have a popover pan so I did 5 tablespoons in a 12 count cupcake pan and i spaced the popovers ever other space. I only put them in the oven for about 20min and although i thought it was very good, the consistency was more like a hollow, soft pancake rather than a custard. I was wondering, would this be due to the fact that i did not use a popover pan? they still “popped” significantly over the rim, or maybe it was because it was in the oven for too long?

    Reply

    • Michelle on March 26th, 2013 at 12:11 am

      Hi Tina, They are supposed to be hollow pancake-like pastry, they will not turn out like a thick, dense custard.

      Reply

    • Evey on March 27th, 2013 at 2:32 pm

      Popovers are sensitive to changes in temperature and moisture levels and will not pop up just right if the oven temperature changes while they are baking…this includes cracking the door for a peek at the lil lovelies.

      Reply

  43. Kevin (Closet Cooking) on March 19, 2013 at 6:47 pm

    Those popovers look amazing!

    Reply

  44. Lena on March 19, 2013 at 9:50 pm

    I make popovers for my kiddos all the time and they LOVE them. I serve them with some thin frosting (melted butter, powdered sugar, milk and vanilla… Just stir together until it looks right) and the kids like to “rip ‘em and dip ‘em”! I will try your version with powdered sugar in the popovers as my recipe doesn’t call for it. Thanks for the post!

    Reply

  45. Tabalina on March 19, 2013 at 10:16 pm

    I have to admit I’ve never had a popover either. I came across this website though, where she made a new popover recipe each week. I normally wouldn’t post another site or link, but this seems perfect with your popover recipe post :)

    http://doughmesstic.com/the-popover-project/

    She includes sweet and savory popovers! I just ordered my popover pan and will be giving a lot of these a try!

    Reply

  46. Laura Dembowski on March 19, 2013 at 10:33 pm

    I love popovers! I have had them at Neiman Marcus several times, as they are known for them. I will have to try to make my own – it couldn’t be easier.

    Reply

  47. Candice on March 21, 2013 at 12:23 pm

    Mmm…I love popovers. I’ve had them at Neiman Marcus where they serve it with strawberry cream cheese. So delicious! Is it necessary to buy a popover pan? I’m hesitant to buy it as it’s so bulky.

    Reply

    • Michelle on March 26th, 2013 at 12:26 am

      Hi Candice, Some readers have commented above that they have made these in muffin tins, but you need to be careful about how much batter you add to each well.

      Reply

  48. Stephanie Krinke on March 24, 2013 at 1:07 pm

    I love these with honey butter! Yum!

    Reply

  49. Evey on March 27, 2013 at 2:06 pm

    Popovers are one of my favorite recipes, right behind Brioche. I’m not a cook or baker at all and have always had fun and success with them. No popover pan needed – muffin pans work right if you be mindful of the batter. So glad to see you try them!

    Reply

  50. Joe on August 9, 2013 at 7:20 am

    Yer we call them Yorkshire puddings in the UK. When a friend from Texas said he had never heard of them I was shocked. I’ve never thought of them being eaten with sweet stuff. All roast dinners need to be accompanied by a Yorkshire pudding. We just use muffin tins to make them and add no sugar, just some pepper. There excellent for cleaning up the plate afterwords. Or at festivals they will make huge ones filled with mashed potato, gravy and sausages. You should try Toad in the Hole, You make the mixture the same but bake it in a large tray with sausages in the batter. I’ll try them with jam and butter for breakfast one day. I suppose it makes sense. There just pancakes on steroids.

    Reply

  51. Michelle Garringer on December 21, 2013 at 3:32 pm

    cinnamon sugar popovers- melt 4 tbs of butter and mix 2/3 cup sugar and 1tsp cinnamon ( for any cinnamon based treats i also add a pinch of cardamon, nutmeg, and allspice in witht he cinnamon) dip hot popover in melted butter than with tongs roll in sugar mixture. – eat right away! i only did this for the two i was going to eat and i’m glad i did- keep any leftover popovers to reheat and then dip after-. i love my popover pan. i bought it as a christmas gift to myself since i wanted to make yorkshire puddings for christmas dinner with my roast- i’m very glad i did. i loved these cinnamon sugar popovers and will love finding new ways ( sugar by itself will be one) to test them. i tried the ramekins one time and it wasn’t a success i have seen just a muffin tin .. i had to adjust my oven temp due to my oven burning things at 400- 375 for 35 minutes and they were gorgeous! Thank you! .

    Reply

  52. Kiki on March 28, 2014 at 9:06 pm

    My mother used to make popovers. She never put a ton of butter in the bottom so I guess it was a different recipe. Yours sounds more like Yorkshire pudding. My mother always made them in a muffin tin. They were super light and delicious. She would make vanilla pudding and fill them with that, then melt a chocolate bar in a double boiler, and top them. Then ended up similar to a chocolate eclair. Yummy.

    Reply

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